Illinois Economy

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Fashion designer Eileen Fisher on how women lead differently than men

Jun 28, 2018

Top executives, policymakers and artists gather at the Aspen Ideas Festival every year to share their expertise with the public. This year, the focus is on globalization, free speech and how we’re adapting to an increasingly technical world. Marketplace is at Aspen focusing on what those experts are saying about the future. What’s next for the Trump administration’s antitrust efforts? Or the potential for a world without credit cards?

Tuesday's U.S. Supreme Court decision to rule in favor of Mark Janus in the Janus v. AFSCME case effectively changed the entire way public unions raise funds for their collective bargaining services. The ruling now bars unions from collecting fees from non-union members with the court citing this now defunct fee requirement as a violation of free speech.

If the threatened 25 percent tariffs on cars produced in the European Union coming into the United States are imposed, more and more people may head to the used car lot. 

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How women might lead differently than men

Jun 28, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that unions can't collect fees from non-union members in the public sector, but this decision could still have implications for the private sector. We'll look at the relationship between these private-sector unions and the organization of government workers. Afterwards, as part of a series of interviews we're conducting at the Aspen Ideas Festival, we'll talk to designer Eileen Fisher about the differences between startups run by women and ones run by men.

Migration could become "fateful issue" for EU

Jun 28, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service…German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she is listening to concerns from around the European Union about migration. But, as European leaders meet today in Brussels, she faces a tough task trying to get countries to agree on a common policy.

How China is building a parallel tech economy with or without the U.S.

Jun 28, 2018

The Trump administration this week decided against the hard trade restrictions it had been considering against China, but it's still planning on new tariffs on Chinese goods. Starting next month, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin made it clear the government would aggressively protect the U.S. tech industry. Meanwhile, China is working on building up its own advanced tech economy, one that doesn't rely on the United States or anyone else. Marketplace’s Molly Wood talks with our China correspondent Jennifer Pak, about the Chinese government's tech initiative called Made in China 2025.

The Trump administration this week decided against the hard trade restrictions it had been considering against China, but it's still planning on new tariffs on Chinese goods. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin made it clear the government would aggressively protect the U.S. tech industry. Meanwhile, China is working on building up its own advanced tech economy, one that doesn't rely on the United States or anyone else. Marketplace’s Molly Wood talks with our China correspondent Jennifer Pak about the Chinese government's tech initiative called Made in China 2025. (06/28/2018)

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The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on online shopping left two things clear – consumers who buy online will have to pay sales tax on more items, and some states will see more money from those online purchases.

The Trump administration announced it is not imposing additional investment restrictions on China for now. Instead, the White House endorsed a plan working through Congress to reform the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. It’s an interagency committee, commonly known as CFIUS, that doesn’t come up much in casual conversation, not even in Washington. But with the ongoing administration concerns about China, it’s getting a lot more attention.  

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How might states be affected by overturning the established precedent allowing public-sector unions to collect fees from nonunion members? In places where the so-called agency fees have been allowed, state officials will have to rewrite the law and revise contracts with public-sector unions. Losing those agency fees will be a big financial hit for some unions. But not for all.  Some public-sector unions, anticipating change, have launched campaigns to persuade workers to stick with the union and join up if they’re not yet members.

As Brexit looms, Dublin vies for financial crown

Jun 27, 2018

Brexit is, overall, bad news for Ireland.

But there could be one, perhaps, significant benefit for the Irish from the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union. European financial centers like Frankfurt, Paris and Luxembourg have been vying for the business that London is expected to lose, and Dublin, it seems, is also in with a chance.

But is the Irish capital a suitable location for a major financial center, and after suffering its own desperate financial crisis only 10 years ago is it ready to put the welcome mat out for a lot more bankers?  

Reprise: “Pregnant? We can help.”

Jun 27, 2018

In light of the recent Supreme Court ruling on crisis pregnancy centers, we wanted to re-share this episode. Federal TANF dollars (also known as federal welfare dollars) goes to funding some crisis pregnancy centers, thanks to the way the 1996 Welfare Reform bill was written.

Our episode from season one includes a rare look inside one of the crisis pregnancy centers that gets welfare/TANF funding and it’s well-worth another listen.

How Ireland rebounded after Europe's debt crisis

Jun 27, 2018

European Union leaders gather in Brussels this week to talk about — among other things — Brexit and Ireland. Britain’s departure from the bloc could cause big problems for the Irish since the United Kingdom is its second-largest export market and it ships a lot of its exports to the rest of the European Union via Britain. That trade could be hampered if the U.K. fails to secure a comprehensive free trade deal with the EU before it leaves the bloc. 

Having our day in court

Jun 27, 2018

Seems like every story in the news this week begins and ends at the Supreme Court. Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement today, of course, but we're focusing on the ruling that public-sector labor unions can no longer collect fees from nonmembers. So if you are not a union member, what does this mean for you? And because of this ruling, more than 20 states will have to change their labor laws. We talk about how these states will move forward. Plus, New York City has never been more safe, clean, healthy … or rich. So how has mega-wealth changed the city and its potential?

And the markets are back up again

Jun 27, 2018

(Markets Edition) After a lackluster start of the week for the markets, they seem to be back up this morning. We'll hear from Jay Bryson, managing director and global economist at Wells Fargo, about how America's attempts to de-escalate its trade fight with China have played a role in this, and what to expect from the release of this week's second-quarter GDP numbers. Afterwards, we'll look at the significance of the Supreme Court case Janus v. AFSCME, which will decide whether government workers who aren't in unions have to pay union fees.

Supreme Court deals big setback to labor unions

Jun 27, 2018

The Supreme Court says government workers can't be forced to contribute to labor unions that represent them in collective bargaining, dealing a serious financial blow to organized labor.

The justices are scrapping a 41-year-old decision that had allowed states to require that public employees pay some fees to unions that represent them, even if the workers choose not to join.

Scrambling to keep people reaching for yogurt and breakfast cereal, General Mills and other packaged good manufacturers are trying to find new ways to compete as sales slump. General Mills holds its fourth quarter earnings call this morning before the bell.

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With trade tensions seemingly escalating, companies are now reacting. Some are starting to move production overseas, adjust their supply chains and raise prices. Once these shifts happen, how hard is it for companies to shift back?

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(U.S. Edition) India's the latest country to be embroiled in trade negotiations with the U.S. And like so many other countries, they're threatening retaliatory tariffs. Companies are reacting by announcing plans to move production overseas, but what does it mean to make a shift like that? We'll look at the challenges that come with shaking up your supply chain.

The border between the British province of Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic is proving one of the thorniest issues arising from Brexit.

The Dublin government, backed by the European Union, is demanding that the border remain as open as it is today, after the United Kingdom leaves the European Union. The concern is that customs checks would hinder trade between north and south and might even reignite the old, violent struggle over a united Ireland.   

U.S. trade tensions with China are very much about technology. The Trump administration is set to roll out new restrictions this week on Chinese tech investments in the United States and possibly more tariffs in areas like robotics, aerospace and green tech. That's on top of the new 25 percent tariff, set to take effect on July 6, on other Chinese imports, many of them tech related.

"The government is often the underdog," the U.S. assistant attorney general says

Jun 27, 2018

Top executives, policymakers and artists gather at the Aspen Ideas Festival every year to share their expertise with the public. This year, the focus is on globalization, free speech and how we’re adapting to an increasingly technical world. Marketplace is at Aspen focusing on what those experts are saying about the future. What’s next for the Trump administration’s antitrust efforts? Or the potential for a world without credit cards?

Is China forcing U.S. tech companies to hand over their secrets?

Jun 27, 2018

U.S. trade tensions with China are very much about technology. The Trump administration is set to roll out new restrictions this week on Chinese tech investments in the United States and possibly more tariffs in areas like robotics, aerospace and green tech. That's on top of the new 25 percent tariff, set to take effect on July 6, on other Chinese imports, many of them tech related.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … trade officials from India and the U.S. are meeting in Delhi today to try and avoid a tit-for-tat situation on duties. Then, are the leaders of the “nation of shopkeepers” at war with business? Two unlikely bedfellows today signed a joint letter urging the British government to speed up Brexit negotiations as businesses begin to ring the alarm bells even louder on the consequences of a no-deal scenario.

As you’ve been hearing today, the Supreme Court has upheld President Donald Trump’s travel ban. Five, mostly Muslim-majority countries and two others now have their citizens blocked from entering the U.S., unless they’ve been granted a waiver. This is the third version of his travel ban, and has been in effect while the court examined the case. The Trump administration says this ban will help the security of the United States. Throughout the various versions of the travel ban, many businesses and industries, especially in tech, have vehemently disagreed.

New York or LA? Headlines in recent years have been all about people leaving the Big Apple in droves, heading for SoCal. But sometimes the flow does ebb. Witness the announcement today from LA-based Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf. It’s planning to open 100 new locations in New York City over the next decade. What’s behind the move?

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"Westworld" isn't a TV show, it's a franchise film series

Jun 26, 2018

Sunday night was the finale for season two of "Westworld." Some viewers of the HBO show were left bewildered, but that's the point. Sort of. Multiple storylines, timelines, moments that make the viewer question if what they're watching is "real" — they are signature moves for Jonathan Nolan, one of the show's creators.

70: Why is sexual harassment training so bad?

Jun 26, 2018

If you work in an office, chances are you've sat through some pretty lame harassment training — videos, click-through programs and materials that might feel straight out of the '90s. For many of us, these trainings are something to squeeze in between real work and groan about at meetings. Not exactly a path to real change in the #MeToo era. Morgan Mercer is dedicated to the idea that effective training must build empathy. Her startup, Vantage Point, uses virtual reality to immerse people in icky work scenarios that they have to navigate in real time.

The tech industry vs. the travel ban

Jun 26, 2018

Today, a break from talking about the border with Mexico to talk about another migration dispute: President Donald Trump's travel ban, which the Supreme Court upheld today. We revisit how businesses plan to navigate around the restrictions and what's at stake for tech companies. And HBO’s “Westworld” used creative marketing to become one of the most talked-about shows on TV. Series co-creator Jonathan Nolan is on the program talking about making television in today's crowded market. Plus, the new U.S.

More and more Americans are taking on extra work

Jun 26, 2018

(Markets Edition) We have trade drama on one hand, strong economic growth on the other. What's a market to do? We'll talk to David Kelly, chief global strategist at JP Morgan Funds, about the long-term consequences of trade tension.

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