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Trump Will Be Sworn In With Same Bible As Lincoln And Obama

For all their differences, when Donald Trump takes the oath of office to succeed Barack Obama on Friday, one small but symbolic similarity will be on display. Trump will place his hand on the Bible that President Lincoln used at his first inauguration, the same one President Obama used at both of his swearing in ceremonies. The Lincoln Bible was purchased for the 1861 inauguration by Supreme Court Clerk William Thomas Carroll. Trump will also use his personal Bible, given to him by his mother...

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Statehouse

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After last year’s historic violence in parts of Chicago, a group of state legislators are once again pushing for tougher gun possession laws.

The proposal would ratchet up minimum prison sentences for people who illegally carry a gun.

The ACLU of Illinois opposes the legislation in part because it says it would target the act of carrying a gun, not shooting it.

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Education Desk

The Senate confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of education, has begun.

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Health+Harvest Desk

Chamoy Is Mexico's Flavor Fiesta Condiment, Courtesy Of China

4 hours ago

The first time I tasted chamoy was in the Mexican border town of Eagle Pass, Texas. At a street cart vendor, chamoy apples sat alongside elotes and tamales. The tart Granny Smith was rolled in a thick paste that was sweet, salty, spicy and sour all at once.

As I took the first bite, I thought: "There is no way this is gonna work." But it did, and after that, the mere thought of chamoy made me salivate like a Pavlovian dog. I had to learn more about it.

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Arts & Life

The Suitcase Junket official show poster
David Landis / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

“Not everyone can pull off the one-man-band gambit without lapsing into schtick, but Amherst’s Matt Lorenz has it all down to an art. the songs are what you remember.”
-The Boston Globe TICKETS 
Friday, January 20, 2017, 8 PM
Bar None, 245 S 5th St, Springfield IL

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Equity

In the early morning hours of November 10, not long after Donald Trump was elected to the presidency, Phillip Atiba Goff, the head of the Center for Policing Equity in New York, fired off an email meant to encourage his colleagues, who worried that their work was about to be sidelined.

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Bedrock 66 Live!

FRIDAY 8 PM

Be a Part of the Recording at Bar None

Politics

Kenya is gearing up for what will no doubt be a contentious presidential election this August.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Illinois Edition: Weekdays Noon-1 PM and 7-8 PM

Midwest Travel: Explore The Titanic In Peoria

Ever since Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet stood on the bow in that blockbuster movie, crowds have flocked to exhibits dedicated to all things Titanic. Swinging a trip to museums in Southampton, England, or Halifax, Nova Scotia, would be a stretch, but your heart can go on with a day visit to Peoria.

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Illinois Issues

Jamey Dunn headshot
mattpenning.com / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Illinois Issues: Editor Jamey Dunn Says Goodbye

Jamey Dunn is leaving the position of Illinois Issues editor. In this week ’s Illinois Issues report , she reflects on her time working here and covering state government.

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Richard Sitler / The Southern Illinoisan

Illinois Issues: Frackonomics

Trending Stories

Video monitors of commission meeting
Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Education Desk: Manar Loses Patience With School Funding Commission

More than any other state in the country, Illinois relies on property taxes to fund public schools. As a result, districts in prosperous areas can spend a lot more per student than districts in low-income or rural areas. A group of lawmakers charged with revamping this scheme has been meeting since summer, facing a deadline of February first. But the group isn’t moving fast enough for State Senator Andy Manar . He’s the leading Democrat on the commission. He’s also considering running for governor.

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Featured

Revisiting A Wedding For The Ages

In 1969, Leroy and Gloria Griffith got married in Chattanooga, Tennessee. It would have been an ordinary event, except that they are believed to be the one of the  first interracial couples  to legally wed in the county. Mary Helen Montgomery ( @mhelenm ) of Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio shares the story of why the couple opened up their wedding to the public, despite racial tension. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Kenya is gearing up for what will no doubt be a contentious presidential election this August.

A partial repeal of Obamacare could leave 18 million people who have insurance today with no coverage one year later, according to an analysis by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office.

The report estimates that 32 million people would lose their insurance over 10 years.

Most Broadway musicals that close after 16 performances barely prompt memories, let alone documentaries. But in 1981, the Stephen Sondheim/George Furth opus, Merrily We Roll Along, rolled along so bizarrely, it became the stuff of Broadway legend, worthy of a 2017 post-mortem. Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened is a theatrically captivating documentary in which a director looks sideways at a musical that goes backwards.

In one of his last moves in office, President Obama has commuted the 35-year prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, the Army private who leaked a massive trove of military secrets to WikiLeaks.

The former intelligence analyst's prison sentence has been shortened to expire on May 17, 2017, according to a statement from the White House.

The Senate confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of education, has begun.

For several years, Oxfam International has released an annual report on global wealth inequity. The numbers were startling: In the 2016 report, Oxfam said the world's richest 62 people owned as much wealth as the poorest 3.6 billion.

We've officially closed the books on 2016 (finally), and we're ready to fall in love with some new music, from the big and hopeful to the crushingly sad.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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