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'We Are Not Afraid': Clinton Delivers Grounded, But Not Soaring, Speech

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnXiy4D_I8g Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States."It is with humility, determination and boundless confidence in America's promise that I accept your nomination for...
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Attorney General Lisa Madigan and a young volunteer at the 2016 Democratic National Convention Illinois delegation breakfast.
Amanda Vinicky / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

What's It Like For Women In Politics Today, In The Words Of Illinois Leaders At The DNC

Hillary Clinton was born in Chicago in 1947, and raised in the suburbs. Sixty-eight years later, she’s making history as the first woman to be nominated for President by a major party. Following, a handful ladies in Illinois’ delegation reflect on Clinton’s candidacy and on what it’s like to be a woman in politics.
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Election 2016

Amanda Vinicky

Hillary Clinton had all week to convince delegates who’d backed Bernie Sanders to get on board with her campaign. By the end of the Democratic National Convention, she'd partially succeeded.

Most of Illinois’ delegates were all gussied up for the convention’s finale.

Alison Squires, a Sanders delegate from Sugar Grove, used black makeup to paint lines across her mouth, as if it’d been sown shut.

Amanda Vinicky

Last night Hillary Clinton - a woman born and raised in the Chicago suburbs – accepted Democrats’ nomination for President.

In roughly 100 days, voters will decide whether she or Republican Donald Trump will be the next president. Which means it’s the beginning of the end for President Barack Obama.

Illinois was right up front throughout the convention.

Literally.

While some states were seated in bleachers, Illinois had front-row seats, on the left side of the stage.

And now and again, Illinoisans were on that stage.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Illinois Edition - Weekdays Noon-1 PM and 7-8 PM

Labor's Ire for Rauner On Display at the DNC

There’s been one theme that’s come up day-after-day at the Illinois delegation’s morning events this week in Philadelphia: Bruce Rauner’s stance on unions.The Illinois governor has advocated for a number of policies in the legislature, in court, and in contract negotiations - that labor unions see as a threat to their very existence. And this week - Illinois Democrats have heard about that fight over and over. Tony Arnold reports.Illinois Democratic delegates have heard from - by my count - 20 union leaders during breakfasts this week.And I can’t play you just one clip from one of these speakers to give you an idea of what they’ve been saying all-week-long about Governor Bruce Rauner. There’s just too much to pick from.
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Illinois Issues

Black Lives Matter Champaign-Urbana

Illinois Issues: Black Lives Matter — More Than A Hashtag

Black Lives Matter is one of the largest activist movements since the civil rights era of the 1960s. The organization has garnered more attention in recent weeks due to protests over the fatal police shootings of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling. Meanwhile, attacks on police and the presidential election have shifted the conversation since Black Lives Matter got its start in 2012 after the death of Trayvon Martin.
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Amanda Vinicky

Hillary Clinton had all week to convince delegates who’d backed Bernie Sanders to get on board with her campaign. By the end of the Democratic National Convention, she'd partially succeeded.

Most of Illinois’ delegates were all gussied up for the convention’s finale.

Alison Squires, a Sanders delegate from Sugar Grove, used black makeup to paint lines across her mouth, as if it’d been sown shut.

Amanda Vinicky

Last night Hillary Clinton - a woman born and raised in the Chicago suburbs – accepted Democrats’ nomination for President.

In roughly 100 days, voters will decide whether she or Republican Donald Trump will be the next president. Which means it’s the beginning of the end for President Barack Obama.

Illinois was right up front throughout the convention.

Literally.

While some states were seated in bleachers, Illinois had front-row seats, on the left side of the stage.

And now and again, Illinoisans were on that stage.

San Diego's police chief says an officer was shot and killed and another was injured after they made a traffic stop late Thursday. A suspect is in custody.

Both officers were assigned to an elite anti-gang unit, police Chief Shelley Zimmerman said at a late-night news conference. She described the incident in San Diego's Southcrest neighborhood, in the southern part of the beach-side city:

Labor's Ire for Rauner On Display at the DNC

28 minutes ago

There’s been one theme that’s come up day-after-day at the Illinois delegation’s morning events this week in Philadelphia: Bruce Rauner’s stance on unions.

The Illinois governor has advocated for a number of policies in the legislature, in court, and in contract negotiations - that labor unions see as a threat to their very existence.

 

And this week - Illinois Democrats have heard about that fight over and over. Tony Arnold reports.


 

 

Illinois Democratic delegates have heard from - by my count - 20 union leaders during breakfasts this week.

 

And I can’t play you just one clip from one of these speakers to give you an idea of what they’ve been saying all-week-long about Governor Bruce Rauner. There’s just too much to pick from.

This week, a man named Eric Aniva from Malawi was arrested after the BBC broadcast the 27-minute radio report " 'Stealing Innocence' in Malawi," which featured Aniva bragging about being paid to sleep with more than 100 young girls and women, some as young as 12 years old.

Dick Durbin said today at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia that he’s focusing on the presidential race, and will make an announcement when the election’s over.

“Regardless of whether I run for another office anytime in my life, I am outraged by what I see in our state. I go down to southern Illinois and have Republican mayors tell me the devastating impact of this budget impact on their local economy. Losing jobs, people losing value in their homes, it is unacceptable.”

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When all was said and done, Team Hillary had to be pretty happy. Their four nights in Philadelphia turned out better than almost anyone expected.

Thursday night featured an orchestrated symphony of praise for Hillary Clinton and a precision-bombing of her opponent, Donald Trump.

When we first learned that Great Performances would have a film about Hamilton, there were those who hoped it would be a full performance by the original Broadway cast that's gradually been departing in recent weeks and months. It's not; it's a film called Hamilton's America, and PBS presented it at the Television Critics' Association press tour on Thursday, where its director, Alex Horwitz, was joined by Daveed Diggs, who just wrapped up his run as both Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson on Broadway.

It's a balmy Sunday night in late June in San Francisco, post-Pride parade, and I'm about to eat dinner in a pristine blue dumpster in a dead-end SOMA (South of Market) street. The event, Salvage Supperclub, seeks to draw attention to food waste and encourage home cooks to not throw out less than ideal, yet still edible stuff.

A glance at the menu and the evening looks promising. The hosts are gracious, the guests friendly and the organizers earnest. The dumpster is simply but tastefully decked out: glass tea lights, long wooden benches, bar towel napkins.

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Featured

For Sanders Supporters, Clinton's Historic Nomination Brings Mixed Emotions

On Tuesday as Hillary Clinton's was officially nominated as the first major party female presidential nominee, women (and yes, some men) all over the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia danced, cried, embraced and howled with joy.The Democratic National Convention erupted into a deafening celebration over a woman being thisclose to the presidency, 240 years after the U.S. was founded and nearly 100 years after women got the right to vote.And it was a show of unity that put her over the top, as...
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Statehouse

Trump and Rauner
Trump by Michael Vadon / Flickr, Rauner by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

State Week: Rauner *Really* Doesn't Want To Talk About Trump

Gov. Bruce Rauner may be done with the presidential campaign, but the presidential campaign isn’t done with Gov. Rauner.
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flickr/ Pal-Kristian Hamre

The governor describes the stopgap budget as a bridge to reform. But it could also be called an excavator — digging the state’s fiscal hole deeper.

Labor unions are attacking Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner for several vetoes issues late last week. The Republican governor rejected measures that would have raised wages for state contractors that take care of the elderly and disabled.

Trump and Rauner
Trump by Michael Vadon / Flickr, Rauner by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Gov. Bruce Rauner may be done with the presidential campaign, but the presidential campaign isn’t done with Gov. Rauner.

Education Desk

Is There A Better Way To Pay For America's Schools?

The Kansas Supreme Court gave state lawmakers an ultimatum:Make school funding more equitable by June 30, or it will consider shutting down the state's public schools.Since then, things have gotten ugly.Lawmakers followed up with a plan — to make it easier to impeach Supreme Court judges who attempt to "usurp the power" of the Legislature or governor.Then came a plan to address the court's concerns over school funding: Send a little more money to roughly two-dozen of the state's poorest...
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At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bill Clinton gave a shout-out to a program called Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youth. In HIPPY, as it's called, parents receive free books, educational materials and weekly home visits to coach them on how to get their young children ready for school.

"Twenty years of research has shown how well this program works to improve readiness for school and academic achievement. There are a lot of young adults in America ... who are enjoying better lives because they were in that program," Clinton said.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bernie Sanders announced that his successful rival, Hillary Clinton, had adopted one of his most popular proposals: Free tuition at public colleges.

Arts & Culture

http://www.nikkilane.com/

The Scene Is Visited By Sean Burns Of Bedrock 66

This week Scott and Rachel talk with Sean Burns. He's been booking roots and Americana music in the area for nearly 20 years and founded the Bedrock 66 Live! concert series which has been sponsored by NPR Illinois. He tells us about the very first Bedrock music festival happening this weekend in conjunction with DSI's Downtown Bacon Throwdown in downtown Springfield.
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When we first learned that Great Performances would have a film about Hamilton, there were those who hoped it would be a full performance by the original Broadway cast that's gradually been departing in recent weeks and months. It's not; it's a film called Hamilton's America, and PBS presented it at the Television Critics' Association press tour on Thursday, where its director, Alex Horwitz, was joined by Daveed Diggs, who just wrapped up his run as both Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson on Broadway.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Will This 'David' Go Under Cover?

4 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Equity

The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 9: Black And Blue

After more than a week of violence and racial tension sparked by the deaths of black men at the hands of police and the shooting deaths of five officers in Dallas, we're getting more perspective from African-American law enforcement officials. We wanted to know how black officers, folks who find themselves right in the middle of heated conversations about race and policing, are processing everything that happened.Gregory A. Thomas, who leads the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement...
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In the Facebook Live video streamed earlier this month by Diamond Reynolds after her fiance, Philando Castile, was fatally shot by a police officer during a traffic stop in a Minnesota suburb, Reynolds identified the man who shot Castile as "Chinese" as she narrated the scene.

In her speech Monday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Michelle Obama said she wakes up "every morning in a house that was built by slaves." She spoke about the feeling of watching her daughters, "two beautiful, intelligent, black young women, playing with their dogs on the White House lawn."

Charles Kinsey, a Florida health worker, was swept into the national debate about police and African-Americans after video of police shooting him went viral.

Illinois Economy

wikimedia.commons

Survey Shows Sangamon County Businesses Worried About State Finances

The Survey Research Office at the University of Illinois Springfield has released the Spring 2016 Sangamon County Economic Outlook Survey.
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SJ-R.com

Sean Crawford talks with the State Journal-Register's Business Editor Tim Landis.

flickr/KatherineJohnson

  NPR Illinois' Sean Crawford talks with Tim Landis, Business Editor for the State Journal-Register.

SJ-R

NPR Illinois' Sean Crawford talks with the State Journal-Register's Tim Landis.

Harvest Desk

It's a balmy Sunday night in late June in San Francisco, post-Pride parade, and I'm about to eat dinner in a pristine blue dumpster in a dead-end SOMA (South of Market) street. The event, Salvage Supperclub, seeks to draw attention to food waste and encourage home cooks to not throw out less than ideal, yet still edible stuff.

A glance at the menu and the evening looks promising. The hosts are gracious, the guests friendly and the organizers earnest. The dumpster is simply but tastefully decked out: glass tea lights, long wooden benches, bar towel napkins.

While many are calling this election a bitter contest, one Philadelphia business has found a sweet side to the electoral process — by reviving a patriotic tradition dating back centuries: clear toy candies.

Made of sugar, water and maybe a little coloring boiled to the correct temperature, then poured into elaborate molds, clear toy candies are a Pennsylvania tradition. With the Democratic convention in town this week, Philadelphia's renowned clear candy maker, Shane Confectionery, is putting out these sweet sculptures with a political theme.

Flour seems innocuous. We've long been warned to wash our hands after handling chicken, and to cook our hamburgers well. We wash lettuce that came straight from the field. But really, flour?

This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reminded everyone that flour is, in fact, a raw, uncooked food, just like those fresh greens. Yes, it can make you sick.

Health Desk

This week, a man named Eric Aniva from Malawi was arrested after the BBC broadcast the 27-minute radio report " 'Stealing Innocence' in Malawi," which featured Aniva bragging about being paid to sleep with more than 100 young girls and women, some as young as 12 years old.

Ten years ago, Arnaldo Silva noticed a lump on his chest and decided to get it checked out.

"I'm sitting in an office with about 80 women, everybody's staring at me. And this lady leaned over she says, 'Are you waiting for somebody?' and I said 'No, I'm here for me,' " the 66-year-old tells his daughter, Vanessa Silva-Welch, during a recent visit to StoryCorps. "And I remember the doctor, he looked at me, he says 'You have male breast cancer. And we gotta move right away.' And then I was told that you had to get tested."

For some people, the attack on police officers by a gunman in Dallas this summer brought to mind another attack by a sniper in Austin 50 years ago – on Aug. 1, 1966. That's when student Charles Whitman stuck his rifle over the edge of the clock tower at the University of Texas at Austin and started shooting. Ultimately, he killed 16 people — and wounded more than 30 others.

For decades, people have struggled to figure out why. There have been theories about abuse, a brain tumor and, of course, mental illness.

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