Statehouse

Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

In the week since his budget address, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has done little to promote his plan or defend it from attacks by Democrats. That’s a significant departure from last year.

Back then, Rauner toured the state, highlighting his call for greater funding of public schools. This year, he took a ski vacation in Utah.

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Education Desk

About 1 out of every 10 public school students in the United States right now is learning to speak English. They're called ELLs, for "English Language Learners."

There are nearly 5 million of them, and educating them — in English and all the other subjects and skills they'll need — is one of the biggest challenges in U.S. public education today.

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Health+Harvest Desk

There are very few scenarios where I could see myself considering the flesh of a fellow human being as food, and the ultimatum "eat today or die tomorrow" comes up in all of them. Most people are probably with me on this.

But Bill Schutt's newest book, Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, reveals that from a scientific perspective, there's a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal. And far more humans — and animals — have dipped into the world of cannibalism than you might have imagined.

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Arts & Life

violin
Jose Zaragoza / flickr.com/jose_zaragoza

UIS' Yona Stamatis talks with guest conductor Ken Lam about this weekend's Illinois Symphony Orchestra concert: "Beautiful Beethoven".

ilsymphony.org

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Equity

Rachel Otwell

Across the country, activists who say they stand in opposition to many of the Trump administration's goals are organizing. Many call themselves the 'Resistance', a nod to terminology previously used by those living under authoritarian regimes. They've been key players in the Women's March on Washington (and in other cities), which has been called one of the largest demonstrations in the U.S. 

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violin
Jose Zaragoza / flickr.com/jose_zaragoza

UIS' Yona Stamatis talks with guest conductor Ken Lam about this weekend's Illinois Symphony Orchestra concert: "Beautiful Beethoven".

ilsymphony.org

Rachel Otwell

Across the country, activists who say they stand in opposition to many of the Trump administration's goals are organizing. Many call themselves the 'Resistance', a nod to terminology previously used by those living under authoritarian regimes. They've been key players in the Women's March on Washington (and in other cities), which has been called one of the largest demonstrations in the U.S. 

On Wednesday, as protesters near the Dakota Access Pipeline began to break down their shelters and leave the area, Brooklyn singer Holly Miranda released a song, a cover of an obscure late-'70s science-fictional folk song, that she'd been working on for two months in support of those leaving.

Last November, helium balloons with pictures of the bridal family floated over Bangalore Palace in southern India, welcoming some 50,000 guests to a $75 million wedding.

About 1 out of every 10 public school students in the United States right now is learning to speak English. They're called ELLs, for "English Language Learners."

There are nearly 5 million of them, and educating them — in English and all the other subjects and skills they'll need — is one of the biggest challenges in U.S. public education today.

Asian Last Names Lead To Fewer Job Interviews, Still

2 hours ago

What's in a name? A lot, according to a new study from researchers at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto. The study found that job applicants with Asian names — names of Indian, Pakistani or Chinese origin — were 28 percent less likely to get called for an interview compared to applicants with Anglo names, even when all the qualifications were the same.

In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy,Code Switch asks how much race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Did the president misjudge the state of race relations in America? Real talk about the Obama legacy is just a click away on this week's podcast. Gene and Shereen are joined by Jamelle Bouie, Slate's chief political correspondent, and Tressie McMillan Cottam, sociologist at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Shereen and Gene continue our conversation on President Barack Obama's racial legacy. Where did the president fall short — or fail — people of color? We hear opinions about Obama's actions as they affected Latinos, African Americans, and Native Americans. Janet Murguia is president of the National Council of La Raza. Simon Moya-Smith is editor of Indian Country Today and a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation. Carla Shedd teaches sociology and African American studies at Columbia University; she wrote the book "Unequal City: Race, Schools, and Perceptions of Injustice."

We conclude our three part series of conversations on President Obama's racial legacy. It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Gene and Shereen are joined by poet Richard Blanco, Angela Rye, head of the political advocacy firm IMPACT Strategies, and NYU history professor Nikhil Singh.

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This I Believe Illinois

Carter Staley / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

This I Believe: Being Fluffy And Fabulous

“Beauty is a state of mind, not a state of the body.” Society portrays that in order to be beautiful you have to be skinny and have the perfect body. Women are made to believe this because they cannot help but see it everywhere.

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The First 100 Days

Asian Last Names Lead To Fewer Job Interviews, Still

2 hours ago

What's in a name? A lot, according to a new study from researchers at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto. The study found that job applicants with Asian names — names of Indian, Pakistani or Chinese origin — were 28 percent less likely to get called for an interview compared to applicants with Anglo names, even when all the qualifications were the same.

Will the election of Donald Trump, who once boasted of grabbing women by the genitalia and has a history of sexist remarks, create a wave of female candidates at all levels of government in the coming years?

Early signs from the groups that work with women considering a bid for office suggest a level of intense interest not seen in at least a quarter century.

Kate Noble had never considered getting involved in politics until she woke up the day after Trump's surprise victory over Hillary Clinton.

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Illinois Edition: Weekdays Noon-1 PM and 7-8 PM

U of I Fascism Historian On "Fake News" & Falsehoods

Manipulation of the truth has long been a tool commonly used by political leaders throughout the Western world, says Peter Fritzsche , a history professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

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Illinois Issues

Facebook/Clinton Auto Auction

Illinois Issues: Civil Asset Forfeiture Critics Complain Innocent People Pay

Disparate entities say laws in this area need to change at the state and national levels.

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Featured

Trump's Election Drives More Women To Consider Running For Office

Will the election of Donald Trump, who once boasted of grabbing women by the genitalia and has a history of sexist remarks, create a wave of female candidates at all levels of government in the coming years? Early signs from the groups that work with women considering a bid for office suggest a level of intense interest not seen in at least a quarter century. Kate Noble had never considered getting involved in politics until she woke up the day after Trump's surprise victory over Hillary...

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