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Gov Presses School Funding Fight

Gov. Bruce Rauner is calling lawmakers back from their summer vacation to deal with a new school funding plan in special session starting Wednesday. The issue has turned into a showdown between the Republican governor and the Democrat-controlled legislature, with the fate of k-12 school children in the balance.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

State Week: Despite Budget Veto, Rauner Presses For School Money

Gov. Bruce Rauner has demanded Democrats send him school funding legislation, threatening to call a special session if they don't. The governor has sought to pit Downstate school school districts — and local legislators — against Chicago Public Schools. Meanwhile, Rauner continued replacing top staff with people from a libertarian advocacy organization.

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Statehouse

A website that popped up this month asks a question as its URL: arethereanywomenrunningforilgovernor.com. It then very simply answers it with a bright red "NO." A group of professional women in the state are behind the effort to draw attention to the issue.

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Education Desk

Emporia, Kansas is home to rolling prairies, wheat fields, and the world's biggest frisbee golf tournament.

But the reason we went there: the National Teacher Hall of Fame, which gives the place it's most revered title, Teacher Town USA.

In 1989 the members of the Emporia local school board and Emporia State University asked, 'Why doesn't anyone honor teachers?'

To fill the void, they created the museum and hall of fame, where the top five teachers in the nation are honored every year. To be eligible, you must have taught for 20 years or more.

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Health+Harvest Desk

In 1915, an advertisement proclaiming, "Bake in a glass!" appeared in the pages of Good Housekeeping. Corning Glass Works in New York had created a product that allowed food to be mixed, baked and served all in the same dish. By 1919, 4 million pieces of Pyrex — a new, durable glassware — had been sold to customers throughout the United States.

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Arts & Life

Geoff Nunberg (@GeoffNunberg) is a linguist who teaches at the School of Information at the University of California at Berkeley.

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Equity

In an attempt to reach a younger and more diverse audience, the largest and most well-known Latino advocacy group in the U.S., the National Council of La Raza, renamed itself this month. The new name, UnidosUS, was announced at the group's 2017 conference in Phoenix. This has caused a rift in the U.S. Latino community — some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind.

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Illinois Economy

flickr/Katherine Johnson

Sean Crawford talks with State Journal-Register Business Editor Tim Landis.

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The Senate is voting Tuesday on whether to begin debating a replacement for the Affordable Care Act. It remains uncertain as to what that replacement might look like. No formal legislation has been drafted. Instead senators are being asked to vote to take a procedural step, known as a "motion to proceed." If there is a majority, 51 senators voting yes, debate will then begin, most likely on a measure to fully repeal the law, also known as Obamacare.

Geoff Nunberg (@GeoffNunberg) is a linguist who teaches at the School of Information at the University of California at Berkeley.

The title of literary historian Bill Goldstein's book refers to a familiar quote from writer Willa Cather. In a 1936 essay, sensing that the literary landscape had shifted under her feet and that her own work was passing out of fashion, she lamented,"The world broke in two in 1922 or thereabouts."

She was referring to the appearance, in that year, of three towering works of modernism: James Joyce's Ulysses, T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, and the English publication of the first volume of Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time.

A website that popped up this month asks a question as its URL: arethereanywomenrunningforilgovernor.com. It then very simply answers it with a bright red "NO." A group of professional women in the state are behind the effort to draw attention to the issue.

Attorney Sergei Magnitsky uncovered widespread corruption in Russia. Then he was arrested.

Magnitsky died under mysterious circumstances in a Russian jail. His employer, Bill Browder, who was previously expelled from Russia, says Magnitsky was beaten to death.

A View From A Russian-American In Moscow

1 hour ago

For many who support President Trump, the investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. election and possible collusion by members of the Trump campaign is little more than a politically motivated witch hunt.

“Obviously, it’s a witch hunt,” says Edward Lozansky, the pro-Putin, pro-Trump president of American University in Moscow.

GUESTS

Edward Lozansky, President, American University in Moscow; professor, National Research Nuclear University and Moscow State University

New Hope For HIV Treatment?

1 hour ago

The story seems almost unbelievable.

“A nine-year-old infected with HIV at birth has spent most of their life without needing any treatment, say doctors in South Africa,” reports the BBC.

After initial treatment as a newborn, the child (whose name has not been released) has been practically HIV-free for eight and a half years. This case and others of extended remission have given researchers hope, and a lot of questions.

GUESTS

Actor Wesley Snipes has played iconic roles — the kind of characters with lines you can quote decades after his movies have left theaters. Snipes is also a film producer and a black belt in karate who has performed many of his own stunts in front of the camera.

His latest career move takes him away from the bright lights of Hollywood to the intimate process of writing fiction. Snipes’ debut novel, “Talon of God,” pits an intelligent heroine against a drug epidemic that creates demons on Earth.

GUESTS

Uber's leadership already has a lot on its plate, starting with finding a new CEO after former chief Travis Kalanick resigned abruptly last month. But that's not all the tech giant has to do. For the business to survive, Uber also has to repair its relationship with drivers, which leaders at the company say is "broken."

"Despacito," the worldwide hit from Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee which just last week was touted as the most-streamed song to date, has now become the subject of a surprise appropriation by Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro.

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Illinois Issues Forums

Illinois Issues Forum on the state budget and the challenges ahead at the Peoria City Hall.
Sarah Scott / Peoria Public Radio

WATCH-LISTEN: State Budget Forum - Peoria

NPR Illinois continued its listening tour on the state's fiscal health co-hosting an Illinois Issues Forum in Peoria on July 20. Community members attended to tell how they have been impacted by the state budget impasse.

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Illinois Issues

Carter Staley / NPR Illinois

Illinois Issues: The Battle Over Transparency And Privacy In The Digital Age

The issue pits business interests against privacy concerns. For Carolyn Parrish, a privacy professional based in Evanston, data privacy is just as important in her personal, everyday life, as it is to keeping her business running.

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Featured

Bikes May Have To Talk To Self-Driving Cars For Safety's Sake

Proponents of self-driving cars say they'll make the world safer, but autonomous vehicles need to predict what bicyclists are going to do. Now researchers say part of the answer is to have bikes feed information to cars. A few years ago on Google's campus, Nathaniel Fairfield arranged an unusual lunch break. He asked a bunch of staff to hop on bikes and ride around and around a self-driving car to collect data. "It was kind of gorgeous," he says. Fairfield is the principal software engineer...

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