Noel King

Morning News Brief

7 hours ago

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Yesterday tens of millions of people woke up to a message from Facebook.

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As Memphis marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., NPR sat with three generations of a Memphis family to find out: What does Dr. King mean to you?

The family is Robert Tunstall, 67, his daughter Karen Hartridge, 40, and her son, James Hartridge, 11.

When Martin Luther King, Jr. flew from Atlanta to Memphis on the morning of April 3, 1968, he was not in a particularly good state of mind.

"While the plane was about to take off, there was a bomb threat that was specifically targeted at King and that delayed the departure of the flight," says Joseph Rosenbloom, author of the new book Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Last 31 Hours. "They brought dogs onto the plane, they evacuated the passengers. And so the plane arrived an hour or so late in Memphis."

Economic inequality is complicated and emotional. Conservatives have one set of solutions. Liberals have another. Some groups don't think inequality is such a bad thing. Conversations about it often turn into partisan fights.

But today on the show, we follow two thinkers—from opposite sides of the political spectrum—who have joined forces to find out what's causing inequality. They are Brink Lindsey and Steven M. Teles, and they are the authors of a new book called The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality.

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Danielle, Este and Alana Haim have been making music together pretty much their whole lives. Four years ago, as the pop-rock group HAIM, the trio released its debut album, Days Are Gone, which launched it into rock stardom.

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Four thousand or so people are struggling with a difficult question right now. They recently found out that they are descendants of slaves who were sold to pay a debt owed by Georgetown University. Georgetown is trying to make amends.

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After Steve Flatow's daughter was killed in a terrorist attack, he wanted justice. He embarked on a legal quest to get the right to sue a country: Iran. His case opened the doors to a new technique for deterring funding of terrorists, but it also interfered with the U.S. government's diplomatic efforts.

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One of Donald Trump's flashiest campaign promises was to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Well, Noel King from our Planet Money podcast found that some construction and concrete firms have already been thinking about what that would entail.

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Some cities like Baltimore have lost residents, so they're trying to shrink, mostly by tearing down abandoned houses. Noel King from our Planet Money podcast spent time on a block in Baltimore that everyone wants torn down.

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