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This week in the Russia investigations: Trump wanted to fire Mueller — does that matter? Parsing the tea leaves of the palace intrigue. And is this the end of the FBI memo meshugas?

Whoa

President Trump reportedly tried to fire Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller last year, not long after firing FBI Director James Comey. But White House counsel Don McGahn wouldn't go along, so the president backed off.

If you thought 2016 was bad, just wait for the sequel.

Russian election interference seeped into nearly every aspect of the political landscape two years ago, but many experts are wondering whether upcoming U.S. elections could be worse.

Unable to walk or talk, barely able to see or hear, 5-year-old Maddie Holt of Everett, Wash., waits in her wheelchair for a ride to the hospital.

The 27-pound girl is dressed in polka-dot pants and a flowered shirt for the trip, plus a red headband with a sparkly bow, two wispy blond ponytails poking out on top of her head.

President Trump's reported order last summer to fire Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller is all about obstruction of justice — whether it happened, and whether it could be proved.

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President Trump has been asked many times whether he was thinking of firing the lawyer leading the investigation into Russia's election interference, and usually the president's answer goes like this.

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Well, joining us now to discuss immigration and some of the other major political stories of the week are Reihan Salam, the executive editor for the National Review and a columnist for Slate - welcome back.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jan 26, 2018

President Donald Trump says he’s game for a conversation, under oath, with special counsel Robert Mueller. But will Trump’s lawyers let him talk?

And what was the president’s point in asking acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe about who he voted for in 2016?

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Updated at 10:35 a.m. ET

Cecile Richards, the longtime president of Planned Parenthood, will step down later this year, the organization announced on Friday.

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President Trump took a shot at selling himself to the global elite today.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: You are national leaders, business titans, industry giants and many of the brightest minds in many fields.

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Can We Trust The Numbers?

About Anne Milgram's TED Talk

As New Jersey Attorney General, Anne Milgram transformed the most dangerous city in her state. She changed a criminal justice system based on gut and instinct to one supported by data and statistics.

About Anne Milgram

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour Can We Trust The Numbers?

About Mona Chalabi's TED Talk

We need statistics to make fair policy decisions, but there are a lot of bad stats out there. Data journalist Mona Chalabi says you need skepticism and a list of questions to face any dubious stat.

About Mona Chalabi

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Can We Trust The Numbers?

About Cathy O'Neil's TED Talk

Mathematician Cathy O'Neil says algorithms embed existing bias into code — with potentially destructive outcomes. Everyone should question their fairness, not just computer scientists and coders.

About Cathy O'Neil

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Can We Trust The Numbers?

About Alan Smith's TED Talk

For years, Alan Smith analyzed the most reliable demographic data in the U.K. – the census. He noticed people's perceptions conflicted with reality, and wondered if there was a way to bridge the gap.

About Alan Smith

Updated at 12:42 p.m. ET

President Trump, playing salesman-in-chief Friday morning at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, declared, "America is open for business and we are competitive once again."

He also proclaimed, "America first does not mean America alone."

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Now let's go to Davos, Switzerland, and NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley, who's traveling with the president. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

"Racist."

Some people hear that word and picture a hood-wearing, cross-burning bigot. Others think more abstractly — they hear racist and think of policies, institutions, laws and language.

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The White House has now specified an immigration plan that President Trump will accept. And isn't that a change, Sue Davis?

Recent FBI investigations relevant to the 2016 presidential election have become the latest battleground in our deeply divided and partisan politics.

Some Republicans, disappointed by the lack of charges over Hillary Clinton's emails and distressed by the continuing probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election, suddenly perceive corruption in the FBI. Democrats counter that the casting of doubt on the nation's top national law enforcement agency is an unprecedented outrage.

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What China Wants From The U.S.

Jan 26, 2018

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Updated at 1 p.m. ET

Barely a month ago, a federal judge in New York dismissed an anti-corruption lawsuit against President Trump.

But on Thursday, another federal judge, in a different courtroom, gave the same basic argument a much friendlier response.

Judge Peter Messitte, of federal district court in Greenbelt, Md., seemed sympathetic to the assertion that Trump profits from the nexus of his hotels and the presidency.

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