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Donald Trump won the backing of the National Rifle Association and many gun owners by opposing limits to the Second Amendment's right to bear arms. But since his election and in the early months of his presidency, Trump has not been good for the gun business.

Shares of publicly traded firearms companies have fallen. The pro-gun president nicking the fortunes of the industry he vowed to protect may seem illogical on its face.

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Now, let's get the latest on the various investigations into Russian meddling in the U.S. presidential election. And let's begin with President Trump's former national security adviser, retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn.

The "most beautiful candidate in Serbia" (self-proclaimed) arrives in the sleepy town of Kovavica at midday, a loudspeaker perched atop his aging car.

He's tall, blue-eyed and wearing his signature white suit, tie and shoes, his long hair in a man-bun.

His name is Ljubisa Beli Preletacevic, or just Beli for short. It means "the guy in white who switches his beliefs for political gain," says the candidate himself.

"I'm every bad politician rolled up into one young, strong man," he declares.

Every recent president has promised to innovate the way government works, and this week, the Trump administration announced its plan to do the same.

The initiative is called the White House Office of American Innovation. Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and senior adviser, will lead a team that includes business executives with little or no government experience. The Trump team says its agenda includes "modernizing government services" and "creating transformational infrastructure projects."

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Now we turn to Ames Simmons. He's director of transgender policy at Equality North Carolina and joins us from Durham. Hi there.

AMES SIMMONS: Thank you for having me, Ari.

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North Carolina's Democratic governor, Roy Cooper, has signed a bill that repeals and replaces a controversial law.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

The Trump administration is gearing up for a rework of the NAFTA treaty between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Thursday the administration hopes to soon start the 90-day countdown clock to opening talks. A letter circulating on Capitol Hill suggests the administration may take a less extreme approach to negotiations than expected.

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Updated: 5:13 p.m.

The vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee accused Russian President Vladimir Putin Thursday of ordering a "deliberate campaign carefully constructed to undermine" last year's presidential election.

While the political world continues to focus on the machinations of congressional investigations about Russia (which won't have conclusions drawn for months, if not longer) and where health care goes from here, there's another, arguably more important story going on — ramped-up military engagement.

Here's the New York Times Thursday:

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The House Freedom Caucus is resurgent.

The group of roughly 36 hard-line conservatives was at the leading edge of Republican opposition during the Obama years. It wasn't clear how relevant the caucus would be with a Republican in the White House.

Some of President Trump's proposed spending cuts would cripple programs that benefit communities full of his rural supporters, but at least in Strong City, Kan., some say they are ready "to bleed a little bit."

Strong City is a former railroad town of about 460 people, less than half the size it was in 1890. Trump's proposed budget aims at killing the program that threw a lifeline to the town's water system.

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And the House Intelligence Committee sounded so bipartisan when it began investigating Russian election meddling.

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And we have a new entry on the list of the world's political dramas. In this case, it's also a comedy. Joanna Kakissis reports on the upcoming presidential election in Serbia.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Foreign language spoken).

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Tillerson's Task Ahead For Turkey Visit

Mar 30, 2017

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The Trump administration has appealed an order by a federal judge in Hawaii that indefinitely blocks the president's executive order restricting travel to the U.S. from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

The state of Hawaii sued to stop the travel ban, arguing the president's policy violates the Constitution. U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson extended his nationwide order blocking the executive order while the lawsuit continues. The administration has asked the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to rule against Watson.

Two separate high-profile incidents broadcast this week highlighted the criticism black women regularly face in the workplace and spurred many to share their own experiences on social media.

Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet with President Trump next week, a senior State Department official said Tuesday.

This visit will be the first in-person meeting between Trump and Xi, after Trump's sharp criticisms of China during the presidential campaign.

Trump and Xi are likely to get together at Trump's Mar-A-Lago resort, though the White House hasn't officially announced the visit. Likely topics for discussion are Trump's threats to counter China's trade policies, which he has called unfair.

The White House says President Trump has a new special assistant on his staff — his daughter Ivanka. The announcement comes a week after the president's oldest daughter moved into her own office in the West Wing to work on women's issues.

Her shift from an informal adviser at the White House to an unpaid government employee is small but important. She was already applying for security clearance, had access to classified information and was meeting with world leaders.

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