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When Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before a joint Senate Committee on Wednesday, he led off with a mea culpa. Just a few paragraphs into his opening statement, he took personal responsibility for the disinformation:

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Yesterday tens of millions of people woke up to a message from Facebook.

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Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

Wendy Vitter, nominated by President Trump for a federal judgeship, tried Wednesday to walk back several controversial comments she made about abortion and birth control.

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Well, he survived day one on Capitol Hill, and today, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg heads back for another day of testimony before Congress. He spent nearly five hours testifying in front of Senate committees yesterday.

In elections past, the integrity of the vote was protected by poll workers and election officials. But in 2018 and likely beyond, elections are being protected by people like the anonymous man who works in the basement of the West Virginia Capitol.

He's member of the West Virginia National Guard who is a cybersecurity specialist responsible for monitoring any computer-related threats to the state's elections. Since August of last year, he's been attached full time to the office of Secretary of State Mac Warner.

President Trump quietly signed an executive order Tuesday, directing federal agencies to strengthen the work requirements for various welfare programs. The move could eventually affect recipients of Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance and cash welfare.

The administration argues that despite low unemployment — just 4.1 percent last month — enrollment in various government assistance programs remains high, years into the economic recovery.

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Today is the first of two days of hearings. Tomorrow Zuckerberg will stand before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

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President Trump quietly signed an act last month encouraging U.S. officials to visit Taiwan, angering China amid mounting tensions over trade.

Updated at 9:58 p.m. ET

President Trump believes Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller has gone too far in his probe of potential ties between Trump's campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said Tuesday.

Her statement to reporters did little to tamp down speculation that Trump may seek to fire Mueller — an authority that Sanders says Trump enjoys.

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Today is the first of two days of hearings. Tomorrow, Zuckerberg will stand before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

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Facebook took center stage on Capitol Hill today as founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered to senators on the judiciary and commerce committees, and he started with an apology.

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Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Mark Zuckerberg faced dozens of senators — and the American television audience — to take "hard questions" on how Facebook has handled user data and faced efforts to subvert democracy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I'm sorry," the co-founder and CEO of Facebook, uncharacteristically wearing a suit, said in his opening remarks. "I started Facebook, I run it, and I'm responsible for what happens here."

Top Trump Trade Adviser Touts Tariffs

Apr 10, 2018

There is no trade war between the U.S. and China — yet — but many folks, from American farmers to investors, are worried about what response U.S. tariffs on imports will trigger.

Peter Navarro isn’t concerned.

Is A Middle Finger A Matter Of Free Speech?

Apr 10, 2018

Last year, Juli Briskman got fired after a photo of her flipping the bird at the president’s motorcade from her bicycle went viral. Now she’s suing her employer, saying whatever hand signals she makes when she’s off the clock are her business.

Fake news on Facebook didn’t start with the 2016 election. Nearly a decade ago, users posted dire warnings that the network was about to start charging users.

It wasn’t true. But would it have been so bad?

Instead of charging users, Facebook made its money by selling ads targeted to them. It enforces the old saying about the web that if you aren’t a customer, then you’re the product.

The FBI raids on Monday targeting President Trump's longtime personal attorney, Michael Cohen, sent a jolt through Washington and darkened the legal cloud hanging over the administration.

Trump lashed out at the Justice Department and special counsel Robert Mueller, telling reporters that "it's a disgraceful situation" and "an attack on our country."

On Tuesday, Trump zeroed in on a particular angle of the raid: the seizure of privileged communications between Cohen and his legal clients, the most prominent of whom, of course, is the president.

Mississippi's new senator is making a name for herself in the state's history books as the first woman to represent the Magnolia State on the Hill.

President Trump has canceled his planned trip to Latin America this week.

The commander in chief and his advisers are deciding on a response to the Syrian government's alleged chemical weapons attack on its own people. And closer to home, the office of the president's personal lawyer was raided by the FBI on Monday.

So Trump is staying put, the White House says.

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President Trump's adviser on homeland security, who helped coordinate the administration's response to a series of powerful hurricanes last year, is leaving the White House.

Tom Bossert's departure as counterterrorism and homeland security adviser comes one day after John Bolton took over as Trump's national security adviser.

"The president is grateful for Tom's commitment to the safety and security of our great country," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement. "President Trump thanks him for his patriotic service and wishes him well."

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