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Donald Trump's Colorado supporters are gathering at the state capital Friday to make some noise about a political process they say has left them voiceless. The backlash from Trump's supporters has included thousands of voicemails and texts a day to the state Republican Party's chairman, some threatening, after his phone number was leaked online.

If Bernie Sanders surprises pollsters and confounds expectations in the New York primary on Tuesday, April 19, his backers and staff will trumpet the effect of his ninth debate with rival Hillary Clinton on the night of April 14.

They will say the relentlessly aggressive strategy Sanders pursued in the latest CNN debate, with its steady stream of attacks on Clinton, provided the defining moment in a long campaign for a nomination that remains up for grabs.

This story is part of an election-year project focused on how voters' needs of government are shaped by where they live. NPR will explore parts of the country not on the primary calendar and not crowded with journalists following each twist of campaign season. First up: Illinois, the state that most broadly represents America in terms of race, income, age, religion and education.

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"New York values" got a lot of love from Republicans in New York City on Thursday night.

All three Republican presidential hopefuls attended the New York State Republican Gala, a $1,000-a-plate fundraiser for the state GOP. It took place just days before New York's primary, which comes amid an unusually contentious campaign for the nomination.

Organizing for Action, the grass-roots network born from the Obama campaigns, is now deep in the battle over confirming the president's nominee to the Supreme Court. These days, OFA is a nonprofit that organizes on progressive issues and trains future grass-roots gurus.

"You know this is very much an organization that is led by people out in their communities who care about the issues of the day," said Buffy Wicks, a member of OFA's board of advisers and a veteran of Obama's two presidential campaigns and his White House.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In substance, the ninth Democratic debate was essentially a recap of previous ones. In style, it was new — sharp and contentious, as Clinton and Sanders clashed on guns, Wall Street, minimum wage and "judgment." Clinton hit Sanders hard for being long on ideals but short on practicality. "It's easy to diagnose the problem," she said. "It's harder to do something about the problem." Sanders attacked Clinton for proposing incremental policies. "Incrementalism and those little steps are not enough," he said. Clinton apologized for the consequences of the 1994 crime bill.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders faced off Thursday in one of the more contentious debates in the Democratic nomination fight to date.

The CNN-hosted debate in Brooklyn — where both campaigns have headquarters — comes just days ahead of the April 19 New York primary.

Trailing Clinton in polls and delegates, the Vermont senator kept up a steady stream of familiar attacks against the front-runner in an effort to carry on the recent string of victories he's enjoyed in nominating contests.

This week, a Florida prosecutor announced he would not move forward with a battery charge against Corey Lewandowski, Donald Trump's campaign manager. Lewandowski had been charged after video surfaced showing him grabbing and pulling former Breitbart reporter Michelle Fields after a Trump press conference on March 8 at Trump International Golf Club in Jupiter, Fla.

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We've all seen it. A politician is trying to have a moment when they suddenly get interrupted by protesters. In those moments, what's a politician to do? Here's NPR's Sam Sanders.

This was supposed to be a quiet week for Mike Rendino. He manages Stan's, the bar across the street from Yankee Stadium, and the Yankees are in Toronto.

Instead, it's been bedlam.

Rendino said he's "been inundated with phone calls, emails, contacts on Facebook from the strangers, most random people. The New York Times, the Washington Post."

Bernie Sanders' campaign took to Twitter on Thursday morning to denounce comments made by one of his surrogates at Wednesday night's massive rally in Washington Square Park in New York City.

It was more than an hour before Sanders took the stage, when Sanders supporter Dr. Paul Song said something that earned cheers from the crowd — and outrage from supporters of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Just how far could Republicans go to deny Donald Trump the party's nomination?

A delegate to this summer's convention in Cleveland asserts that the GOP gathering could do anything it wants.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The prospect of Donald Trump as the Republican nominee for president has been raising a lot of questions for the GOP. Not just about how the party will fare in November, but what exactly Trump and "Trumpism" means for future of the party.

NPR asked four conservative thinkers to weigh in: April Ponnuru, Jonah Goldberg, Pete Wehner and Ben Domenech. All are "reformicons" — conservative reformers who've been thinking and writing about how the GOP could modernize itself, update Reaganomics and reach out to young and minority voters.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The war over government access to encryption is moving to the battlefield on which Apple told the Justice Department it should always have taken place: Capitol Hill.

The leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee have introduced a bill that would mandate those receiving a court order in an encryption case to provide "intelligible information or data" or the "technical means to get it" — in other words, a key to unlock secured data.

Donald Trump's campaign manager, who was charged with battery after apparently grabbing the arm of a reporter, will not be prosecuted, a source close to the Palm Beach County, Fla., investigation tells NPR.

Corey Lewandowski was charged with a misdemeanor after a video appeared to show him manhandling a Breitbart news reporter, as NPR's Brian Naylor reported last month.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has focused much of his presidential campaign on economic issues. He describes income inequality as the great economic and political issue of our time.

Less has been written about Sanders' approach to foreign policy. Here's a quick summary:

1. He was against the Iraq War (but he is not a pacifist)

Sanders has highlighted his opposition to the war in Iraq throughout the campaign as a way to draw a distinction with his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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