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Friday News Roundup - International

Jan 12, 2018

Around the world, nations reportedly derided as “shithole countries” by President Trump are reacting with tough (though less vulgar) responses of their own.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jan 12, 2018

This week, President Trump has been asking for action and compassion, telling lawmakers that he wants to see “a bipartisan bill of love” on DACA.

Then he reportedly called some nations “shithole countries” before denying the statement, but admitting to using “tough” language.

President Trump has called it the "one of the worst deals" he has ever seen — but for now, he is keeping the U.S. in the nuclear deal with Iran.

The president decided Friday to continue waiving — that is, easing — some economic sanctions against Iran. That is part of the U.S. commitment in the 2015 nuclear deal known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Under the deal, Iran allows strict limits on its nuclear program in return for easing of economic sanctions.

Poor residents in Kentucky will have to work or do volunteer work if they want to keep their Medicaid benefits after the Trump administration on Friday approved the state's request to add the requirements to its Medicaid program.

The new requirements apply only to "able-bodied" adults who get their health insurance through Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor. People with disabilities, children, pregnant women and the elderly are exempt from the requirement.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

One day after President Trump referred to African nations as "shithole countries," adding that the U.S. should want immigrants from countries such as Norway rather than from Haiti or El Salvador, the countries that came in for the president's criticism are offering some responses of their own.

The number of House Republicans declining to run for re-election has hit a record level in 2018, as 32 GOP members have said they are leaving: 19 are retiring from public office, while 13 are seeking another position.

House Democrats are facing 15 retirements, including three seats they will have to defend in districts President Trump carried in 2018.

Just three members of the Senate have announced their retirements, all Republicans.

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET

President Trump is denying reports, from NPR and other news outlets, that in a Thursday meeting at the White House he disparaged African nations as "shithole countries" and questioned why the United States would admit immigrants from them and other nations, like Haiti.

Trump told lawmakers that the U.S. should instead seek out more immigrants from countries like Norway.

A State Department spokesman on Thursday said anti-Muslim comments made by President Trump's new ambassador to the Netherlands "were not the position of the State Department" — but he also declined to say the comments had been factually inaccurate.

The partial disavowal came a day after Ambassador Pete Hoekstra's first news conference in the Netherlands, in which he was pressed by Dutch reporters to retract the false claims he made in 2015 — when he said the "Islamic movement" was responsible for "no-go zones" and politicians "being burned" in the Netherlands.

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President Trump campaigned on a promise of law and order. He courted endorsements from police unions. And he even hinted to an audience of police officers that he supported the idea of roughing up suspects (the White House later said he was joking).

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Six senators - three Republicans, three Democrats - think they have a solution for DACA. That's the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy.

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President Trump has shown little interest in fighting the threat of Russians hacking U.S. elections. He's shown a lot of interest in fighting voter fraud, something he insists — without evidence — is widespread.

Parts of his administration are doing just the opposite.

Bob Kolasky, an acting deputy undersecretary at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), told a group of election officials gathered in Washington, D.C., this week that the threat of Russian hacking in future elections is "a national security issue."

Americans love Oprah Winfrey — they just don't necessarily want her to run for president.

In a head-to-head matchup with President Trump, Winfrey would win 50 to 39 percent, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

But when asked if they want Winfrey to run for president, a majority (54 percent) said they don't want her to do so, with 35 percent saying they do want her to run.

Updated at 6:55 a.m. ET

President Trump announced early Friday that he has canceled a trip to the U.K. next month, citing a "bad deal" the Obama administration made for a new U.S. Embassy in London.

The president accepted the queen's invitation for a state visit when he met with Prime Minister Theresa May in July at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. The trip had tentatively been planned to begin around the end of February.

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Ever since President Trump opened up DACA negotiations to the news media for an hour - that happened on Tuesday - senators have been meeting in private, trying to close the deal. Arizona Republican Jeff Flake told reporters today it has happened.

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Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

President Trump on Thursday referred to African nations as "s***hole countries" during a meeting on immigration with a bipartisan group of senators, according to a Democratic aide and another person familiar with the conversation.

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Our next guest has been fielding a lot of questions since the administration gave the go-ahead for Medicaid work requirements. Matt Salo is executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors. Welcome to the program.

At a secluded retreat center outside Austin, about a dozen, mostly middle-aged women are gathered in a quiet conference room. Some huddle under blankets to ward off the chill from an unusual Texas cold spell.

This session's topic: guilt and shame.

"Does anybody feel like they're still dealing with, like, shame? Like, feeling bad about yourself as a person, because of what you've done in the clinics?" Abby Johnson asks the women seated in a circle of chairs around her.

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