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Our airwaves are filled with debates about immigrants and refugees. Who should be in the United States, who shouldn't, and who should decide?

These modern debates often draw upon our ideas about past waves of immigration. We sometimes assume that earlier generations of newcomers quickly learned English and integrated into American society. But historian Maria Cristina Garcia says these ideas are often false.

Updated at 1:40 a.m. ET Tuesday

Some members of the Trump administration started off the holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. at a wreath-laying ceremony at the civil rights leader's memorial in Washington Monday. But the president's first stop was his own golf club.

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Eric Motley grew up in Montgomery, Alabama, raised by adoptive grandparents in an area called Madison Park. It’s a place where he no longer lives, but he returns twice a year — to see his hometown, friends and relatives … and to say thanks.

Motley’s story is all about what a good community can do, even when things are bad.

The Personal Toll Of Civil Rights Activism

Jan 15, 2018

The fight for civil rights has always been hard work. It takes a toll on the mind and the body.

And the struggle continues today, 50 years after the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

Every generation has their crusaders: the big names we know, and untold thousands of others whose support makes these movements possible. Who exactly are the new activists and what battles are they fighting? And how do they stay in the fight?

GUESTS

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A reporter asked President Trump once again on Sunday if he's a racist. The president gave an answer he's offered before.

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President Trump marks his first year in the White House on Jan. 20. Since he took the oath, he's been dogged by questions about his hundreds of businesses and the conflicts of interest they pose.

In attempts to confront Trump and force him to address these conflicts, congressional Democrats, state attorneys general and watchdog groups have sued the president. So far, their cases have not advanced very far in court. A federal judge has dismissed one suit.

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President Trump last night responded to allegations of racism.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: No. No. I'm not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed.

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Let's explore an item on the White House's wish list for immigration policy. Here's President Trump in November.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I am today starting the process of terminating the diversity lottery program.

From the moment Donald Trump was elected president, questions started arising about his ability to separate his private business deals from his official duties. Critics became especially alarmed about his overseas holdings, fearing they could influence his foreign policy decisions.

In the year since taking office, has he found ways to address the ethical questions that could taint his foreign policy credibility?

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

Hours after the U.S. government announced it would again begin processing renewal applications for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals due to a federal court order, President Trump claimed that the program — which has granted a temporary legal reprieve to people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children — was "probably dead."

Ken Starr On Investigating A President

Jan 14, 2018

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Rep. Pete Aguilar On DACA

Jan 14, 2018

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The GOP's Latino Outreach

Jan 14, 2018

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Gerrymandering In Maryland

Jan 14, 2018

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President Trump surprised lawmakers at the White House last week when he used a live, televised meeting ostensibly about immigration legislation to voice his support for earmarks.

"Maybe you should start thinking about going back to a form of earmarks," Trump said, laying out a familiar — but hotly contested — argument that when earmarks were in fashion, Washington worked better. "Maybe that brings people together. In our system right now, the way it is set up, will never bring people together."

The hubbub over the Republican tax plan has died down some since it passed, but the bill isn't forgotten — not by a long shot.

Czech President Milos Zeman has won the first round of voting in the Czech Republic's presidential election Saturday, but will have to face second-place finisher Jiri Drahos in a runoff election later this month after failing to win a majority of votes.

Zeman, 73, who has been president of the central European country since 2013, emerged with 38.6 percent of the vote. He has stoked controversy in parts of Europe with support for Russia's Vladimir Putin and anti-immigrant rhetoric. Zeman was also an early supporter of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election.

The Department of Homeland Security says it will once again accept renewal requests from recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in response to a court order.

"Until further notice, and unless otherwise provided in this guidance, the DACA policy will be operated on the terms in place before it was rescinded on Sept. 5, 2017," U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a part of DHS, wrote on its website Saturday.

John Tunney, the former U.S. senator who looked briefly like the future of the Democratic Party and whose rise inspired the Robert Redford film, The Candidate, has died, his brother confirmed to NPR on Saturday.

Tunney died of prostate cancer Friday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 83.

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Federal Election Commission documents dated Jan. 11 show that Chelsea Manning has filed paperwork to run as a Democrat for Maryland's U.S. Senate seat this year.

The race would pit her against two-term Sen. Ben Cardin in the June Democratic primary. Cardin is Maryland's senior U.S. senator, elected in 2006 and re-elected in 2012. He is the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

In a White House meeting with members of Congress this week, President Trump is said to have suggested that the United States accepts too many immigrants from "shithole countries" in Africa and too few from countries like Norway.

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President Trump's vulgar remark about immigrants from certain countries has played out differently in this country depending on the media outlet. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann has a roundup.

What's Next For Salvadorans In The U.S.

Jan 13, 2018

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