Illinois Governor

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Commentary: The time has come to stop talking about a  'truly balanced budget'

“Let’s get a truly balanced budget ... ”  Gov. Bruce Rauner and his aides, in various venues on numerous occasions, 2015-present.

Not to downplay the governor’s mantra, but what exactly is a “truly balanced budget?” 

WIU students demonstrating.
Rich Egger / Tri States Public Radio

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner said the state can fund higher education if it changes how it buys products and services. He said changes could save Ilinois taxpayers around a half a billion dollars a year, but procurement reform wouldn't cover all of the state's higher education spending.

Bruce Rauner at Inauguration 2015
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Bruce Rauner has been sworn in as Illinois' 42nd governor.
 
 The Republican businessman took the oath of office Monday during an inaugural
ceremony in Springfield. He is the first Republican to lead the state in more
than a decade.
 
 Rauner defeated Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn in November with promises to ``shake
up'' state government. He faces an immediate challenge in working with a
Democratic-controlled Legislature to eliminate a multibillion-dollar budget
hole.
 

Courtesy of lpillinois.org

A Sangamon County judge is expected to rule today (Thursday 9/18)
on an appeal by Republican attorneys to remove a Libertarian candidate for
Illinois governor from the November ballot.
 
Sangamon County Circuit Judge Patrick Kelley heard arguments in which the GOP
attorneys questioned the validity of signatures Libertarian candidates gathered
to get on the ballot.
Political analysts say Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Chad Grimm could
draw votes that otherwise would go to Republican candidate Bruce Rauner

State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

This week, more political sparring in the Illinois gubernatorial campaigns.

Treasurer Dan Rutherford
Brian Mackey/WUIS

Treasurer Dan Rutherford is remaining quiet in the final hours of his campaign for Governor.  He also plans on the unusual move of keeping the Election night party for his Illinois gubernatorial bid closed to reporters.  

Spokesman Brian Sterling says Rutherford will issue a statement Tuesday at a Pontiac location separate from his party.  Sterling declined to comment further on Sunday.  

Amanda Vinicky

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn is ramping up his re-election campaign. 

Quinn's campaign announced over the weekend the Chicago Democrat has hired Illinois native Bill Hyers to serve as chief strategist. 

Hyers most recently managed Bill de Blasio's successful campaign for mayor of New York. In 2012 he managed President Barack Obama's Pennsylvania campaign operation. He was Midwest director for Obama in 2008.  

Quinn is seeking his second full term. He faces a lesser-known opponent, anti-violence activist Tio Hardiman of Hillside, in the March 18 primary.  

His critics and supporters alike say Quinn is clean when it comes to funding his campaigns and prioritizing ethics. But some worry more about whether he, as Illinois governor, would work with the legislature and how he would navigate the ship of state
Bethany Jaeger / WUIS/Illinois Issues

The new governor of Illinois once was booed on the House floor. When this magazine last profiled Quinn in 1980, Statehouse insiders described him as a gadfly who persistently challenged the government establishment and grabbed headlines by holding Sunday news conferences (see Illinois Issues, February, 1980, page 4).

Gov. Pat Quinn takes issue with the gadfly stereotype. He cites a number of reforms that he spurred by organizing grassroots movements, all in the name of democracy in the Land of Lincoln.

Peggy Boyer Long
WUIS/Illinois Issues

"[T]he more I see and know of the politicians in this state, the less respect and confidence I have in them." 

Edward Coles 
Illinois ' second governor 
from Mostly Good and Competent Men
by Robert P. Howard

A former governor has been sentenced. The current governor is under investigation. And, as we see in this month's issue, a recent poll shows voters aren't inspired by this year 's contenders.

Taking a page from former Gov. Jim Edgar’s first days in office 12 years ago, Gov. Rod Blagojevich launched his term by cutting personnel and imposing a hiring freeze.

Blagojevich fired Scott Fawell, the $190,000-a-year head of the Chicago Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, shortly after taking the oath as governor. Fawell faces charges of political corruption. The next day, Blagojevich fired 35 of outgoing Gov. George Ryan’s last-minute appointees.