budget impasse

flickr/ Pal-Kristian Hamre

The governor describes the stopgap budget as a bridge to reform. But it could also be called an excavator — digging the state’s fiscal hole deeper.

University of Illinois administrators are warning employees that the state could retroactively increase their health insurance premiums. The university system recently held informational meetings at its three campuses in Chicago, Champaign-Urbana and Springfield.

Courtesy of IBHE

During the recent state budget impasse, Illinois colleges and universities have been forced to scrape by without state funding, except for stop gap money designed to keep them open through the fall semester. But that may not satisfy accreditation agencies. James Applegate, director of the Illinois Board of Higher Education, says the Higher Learning Commission may just home in on the fact that Illinois schools are missing what schools in other states have: a solid budget.

Amanda Vinicky

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-IL, said recent racial killings underscore the need for conversations about race relations and law enforcement, but there are also systemic issues that need more specifically addressed.

Amanda Vincky at work in her office
CARTER STALEY / NPR ILLINOIS | 91.9 UIS

NPR Illinois' Amanda Vinicky has been reporting on the politics at the Statehouse for about a decade, but this past year has presented a whole new set of challenges. Her stories covering the budget stalemate have been broadcast by multiple Illinois public radio stations and occasionally across the nation. Watch what a day is like covering the capitol with Amanda Vinicky. 

State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Democrats and Republicans came together to approve a partial state budget. It's enough to sustain some government operations through the end of the year, but it's still a long way away from functional government.

It's not often the worlds of state government and hair-care converge - but one Illinois reporter has changed that.

Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois/Illinois Issues

Gov. Bruce Rauner has always said schools are his top priority. Last year, he vetoed the budget except for schools. In the stopgap plan negotiated by leaders this week, most services get only six months of funding, but pre-kindergarten through high school grades get a full year. That includes an increase of more than $330 million.

c/o Marvin Lindsey

In an open letter dated June 23rd, Marvin Lindsey writes to Governor Bruce Rauner that the budget impasse has, "...crippled Illinois' behavioral healthcare system." Lindsey is CEO of a non-profit called Community Behavioral Healthcare Association of Illinois.

Democratic leaders in the legislature and Gov. Bruce Rauner appear to be close to a deal to approve some funding for social service providers, higher education, capital construction and state operations. The proposal would also fund K-12 schools for all of next fiscal year.

But the plan can’t erase the destruction caused by the state going for a year without a budget.​​

This is from the June 28, 2016 Daily Show:

Look for the NPR Illinois appearance at :02:36.

Across the state, thousands of newspaper subscribers were met with a single word as the headline on the front page Wednesday: "Enough." 

Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois/Illinois Issues

About a dozen college and university officials gathered at the capitol today to remind lawmakers of the desperate situation schools find themselves in. Most have gone for a year with less than a third of expected state funds. The coalition included presidents of institutions as enormous as the University of Illinois System and as small as the private liberal arts school Illinois College in Jacksonville, whose president warned that state funds need to come quickly.

flickr/ Bill Brooks

 The United Way of Illinois surveyed social services providers in the state and found that during the budget impasse, about  1 million of their clients have lost services due to lack of funding. 

Jamey Dunn
Network Knowledge

Host Jamey Dunn and guests Dave Dahl (WTAX) and Bruce Rushton (IL Times) talk about a bipartisan gun control bill and the budget.

CapitolView is a production of WSEC-TV/PBS Springfield, Network Knowledge.

Gov. Bruce Rauner
NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

  Gov. Bruce Rauner says his Republican negotiators and Democrats are getting closer to an agreement on a partial state budget. Meanwhile, bipartisan gun control legislation has surfaced in the wake of the massacre of 49 people in Orlando, Fla.

A new law makes a drug that counteracts opioid overdose easier to get. But is that enough?

Northlake resident Steve Kamenicky is lucky to be alive.

He’s 58 years old and says he’s used heroin for 46 years, starting at age 12. He has overdosed several times and nearly died, but he survived because of the medication naloxone hydrochloride, also known by the brand name Narcan. 

flickr/Joe Hall

Illinois government has been stuck in a rut for going on 18 months now, and much of the attention has centered on the fight between Governor Bruce Rauner and the Democratic leaders in the General Assembly.

Courtesy of Rock Island Schools

Thanks to the ongoing budget impasse, school districts around Illinois are scrambling to figure out how to open without state funding. Schools that operate year-round will be the first to face their day of reckoning.

Jamey Dunn, Charlie Wheeler, and Brian Mackey
Network Knowledge

Host Jamey Dunn, Brian Mackey, and Charlie Wheeler discuss the possibility of a budget agreement before the end of the fiscal year.

CapitolView is a production of WSEC-TV/PBS Springfield, Network Knowledge.

State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Gov. Bruce Rauner says he and his administration have done "heroic" work to keep Illinois government running. But time and money are catching up with that effort, and that will cost taxpayers for years to come.

  Water from the city of Mount Sterling is flowing to Western Illinois Correctional Center, but money to pay for that water isn't flowing back from the state. Illinois owes the city of 2,000 people more than $300,000.

Illinois political leaders’ performance on the budget is reminiscent of the losingest team in modern baseball. 

Liz Bieze

This is a follow-up to a story we aired back in April, about how the state budget impasse was affecting high school seniors trying to decide where to go to college. In the course of reporting, we met Liz Bieze, one of two counselors at Sullivan High School at Rogers Park in Chicago.

 

Here's what she said then:

 

“I mean I literally, right before you called, was finishing up helping a student draft an email to a financial aid office to appeal her award letter, and she’s our valedictorian of our class. So when your valedictorian, with a 28 ACT, can’t afford to go to school, that’s a big problem.”

Amanda Vinicky on CapitolView
Network Knowledge

Host Amanda Vinicky and guests Jordan Abudayyeh (WICS) and Andy Maloney (Chicago Daily Law Bulletin) discuss the latest on the Illinois State budget crisis.

CapitolView is a production of WSEC-TV/PBS Springfield, Network Knowledge.

Sarah Mueller WUIS

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner used his veto pen Friday to reject a measure that would have provided about $3.9 billion for higher education, mental health treatment and other programs.

a metaphor about Illinois government
I.W. Taber / Wikimedia Commons (public domain)

  After spending seventeen months fighting over the governor’s agenda and the end of May fighting about a temporary spending plan, now Democrats and Republicans are fighting about political fighting itself. Also: whales (!).


The Illinois Department of Transportation plans to spend about $2 billion on roads projects for the next fiscal year that starts July 1, if there's a budget. But, the lack of a deal could kill the construction season. 

 


Even as Illinois is without a budget, the Illinois House has canceled its one-day session.

Illinois Issues: Shredding Lincoln

Jun 9, 2016
Cartoon by Chris Britt

 Power struggles and a loss of funding have put The Papers of Abraham Lincoln in peril.

This story is the product of a collaboration with Illinois Times, Springfield’s independent weekly, where Bruce Rushton is staff writer.

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