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Updated at 4:45 a.m. ET

Dozens of people are dead and scores injured after a violent rain-and-dust storm swept through multiple states in northwestern India Wednesday, knocking down homes and leaving uprooted trees and power outages in its wake.

The storm, which struck weeks before the onset of the monsoon rains, caught many people by surprise.

President Trump suggested late Wednesday that three Americans held in North Korea could be freed soon.

"As everybody is aware, the past Administration has long been asking for three hostages to be released from a North Korean Labor camp, but to no avail. Stay tuned!" the president tweeted.

His remarks come ahead of a possible historic summit between him and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Updated at 3:29 p.m. ET

President Trump admitted Thursday to reimbursing his lawyer for a $130,000 payment made on the eve of the 2016 election to porn actress Stormy Daniels as part of a settlement about her alleged 2006 sexual encounter with Trump.

Trump, however, denied any sexual encounter and claims the payment was in no way connected with the campaign — despite the timing.

Four mass graves were found last week outside Kigali province, the capital of Rwanda, 24 years after the country's genocide. A long process has begun to identify the remains.

An Associated Press photo tells the story of many family members: France Mukantagazwa lifts her glasses to wipe tears from her face. Behind her are dirty, wrinkled clothes belonging to the bodies exhumed from one of the mass graves.

Mukantagazwa lost her father and other relatives in 1994 and thinks their bodies could be in one of the graves.

For a few hours Wednesday, it appeared that the end to Arizona's massive teacher walkout was finally at hand. Protest leaders announced earlier this week they would accept a pay hike that they once dismissed as unsustainable — and Gov. Doug Ducey stood ready to sign it.

The Pentagon says a 43-year-old convicted al-Qaida operative is the first inmate of the Trump administration to be transferred out of the U.S. military lockup in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. After more than 15 years imprisonment there, Ahmed al-Darbi was returned to his native Saudi Arabia to serve his remaining nine year prison sentence.

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Hawaii lawmakers passed a bill Tuesday that would prohibit the sale of over-the-counter sunscreens containing chemicals they say are contributing to the destruction of the state's coral reefs and other ocean life.

If signed by Gov. David Ige, it will make Hawaii the first state in the country to pass such a law and will take effect on Jan. 1, 2021.

Updated at 7:02 p.m. ET

Following the death of a dog aboard a United Airlines flight that provoked an onslaught of criticism on social media, one of the nation's largest carriers will ban certain breeds of cats and dogs from traveling.

Scott Pruitt, the current head of the Environmental Protection Agency, first came to national prominence back when he was Oklahoma's attorney general. In that role, he sued the agency he now runs 14 times, in a series of court cases alleging overreach by the federal government.

Updated at 12:29 p.m. ET Thursday

A judge in New York has ruled that residents of Trump Place, a condominium building on Manhattan's West Side, have the right to remove President Trump's name from the building if enough of them approve of it.

The ruling by New York Supreme Court Judge Eileen Bransten marks a defeat for the Trump Organization, which had argued that removing the name would violate the building's licensing agreement.

Back in 2015, Rachel Dolezal became a walking Rorschach test for America's racial dysfunction. She was the president of the Spokane, Wash., NAACP chapter, and she was outed as white after spending years claiming she was black.

The public backlash, and fascination, was intense.

The popularity of fondue wasn't an accident. It was planned by a cartel of Swiss cheese makers, which ruled the Swiss economy for 80 years.

On today's show: we cut into the Swiss cheese. It's a story about what happens when well-meaning folks decide the rules of economics don't apply to them. And got the world to eat gobs of melted fat. Also, we meet a man known as the 'Cheese Rebel.'

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

There are some video games that put an emphasis on the sound in your headset instead of all the action on the screen. The Nightjar, for example, is one that forces you to listen very carefully.

There's a well-known Russian folktale, "Snegurochka," that tells the story of an elderly couple who yearn to have a child; they create a little girl out of snow, and she comes to life. In her novel The Snow Child, Eowyn Ivey reimagined that story and set it in her home state of Alaska — and now the story has made one more leap, to the theatre at Washington, D.C.'s Arena Stage.

One useful rule of documentaries or quasi-documentaries is: be suspicious of the ones with voice-overs by their subjects. At the very least, be aware that these subjects are being allowed to frame their own stories, so whatever you see is an autobiography of a kind, an assisted self-portrait. In the case of HBO's Being Serena, the series is a collaboration between HBO and the content-producing arm IMG, which belongs to the same sprawling talent management empire that represents Serena Williams.

The Federal Communications Commission is losing one of its two Democrats in the coming weeks.

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Honduran Deana Quczada peels back her young daughter's black hair to reveal a deep scar on her forehead. She was beaten, Quczada says, six months ago as part of an apparent revenge attack on her family by gangs that Quczada's husband may have been mixed up with. When her daughter was released after spending a month in the hospital, Quczada immediately fled with her north in hopes of making it to the United States, where she could ask for political asylum.

I've heard that if you ask the U.S. for help, they will give it, she says in Spanish.

Updated at 11:25 p.m. ET

An Air National Guard cargo plane crashed near Savannah, Ga., on Wednesday morning. At least nine people were killed, according to the local sheriff's office.

The cargo plane, which is attached to the Puerto Rico Air National Guard's 156th Airlift Wing, went down shortly after taking off from the airport in Savannah in the course of a routine mission to Arizona.

A pair of suicide bombings on Tuesday killed more than two dozen people worshipping at a mosque in the small town of Mubi, in northeastern Nigeria.

Dozens more were injured in the attack, which came just one day after Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari made a state visit to the U.S.

Police put the death toll at 28, The Associated Press reports, but local hospital officials and rescue workers tell Agence France-Presse that the total could be far higher.

On a balmy Thursday evening, dozens of young Saudis stream into the AlComedy Club in the western port city of Jeddah. It's the start of the weekend, and the crowd snacks on popcorn and ice cream before grabbing some of the sagging seats in the theater. Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie" blares from speakers hanging above a tiny stage.

The official autopsy of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man shot and killed by Sacramento, Calif., police in March, found that he was shot fewer times, and fewer times in the back, than a private autopsy had concluded.

An autopsy commissioned by Clark's family found that Clark was shot eight times, with at least six shots in the back, contradicting police officers' account that Clark had approached them.

The coroner's office, in a report released Tuesday, found he was shot seven times, three times in the back, in a manner consistent with the police account.

The Boy Scouts program is becoming Scouts BSA in February 2019 to reflect the decision to include young women, the Boy Scouts of America announced on Wednesday.

The organization's name will remain the same; only the program for older youth will change its name.

When I first sat down to talk to Leslie Odom, Jr., I told him that our team had seen him in Hamilton, and then I told him that I suspected that's how many of his conversations started these days. He said that now, it's all about how early people say they saw it. They saw it at the beginning of the run! Before it was a hit! Back when it was at the Public!

Before Hurricane Maria hit last September, Puerto Rico was battered by the forces of another storm — a financial storm.

The island's own government borrowed billions of dollars to pay its bills, a practice that Puerto Rico's current governor, Ricardo Rosselló, now calls "a big Ponzi scheme."

In the wake of the #MeToo movement, it seems like everyone's talking about toxic masculinity. But masculinity, toxic or not, has been on Jamel Brinkley's mind for far longer; his debut short story collection, A Lucky Man, brilliantly examines the topic from a range of angles. To be clear, Brinkley isn't excusing the troubles of masculinity in these stories. Instead, the collection is intent on recognizing what masculinity looks like, questioning our expectations of it, and criticizing its toxicity — and somehow managing to do all of that with love.

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