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100 Expressions: Elizabeth Marx

Jun 5, 2017

Elizabeth L. Marx, Springfield

Title: Donald and Friends

Medium: Digital

Narrative: “Donald and Friends” was created to show my dissatisfaction with the present Trump administration and the course he is guiding America now.

Concert pianist Simone Dinnerstein has shared her love of classical music with children across America.

Now she’s working with a youth orchestra in Havana, after a highly unusual recording session.

What’s it like to play Mozart, after midnight? And could American-Cuban cultural exchanges like this continue

if the Trump Administration reinstates travel restrictions between America and Cuba? We’ll discuss.

GUESTS

Simone Dinnerstein, Concert pianist

100 Expressions: Michelle Smith

Jun 5, 2017

Michelle Smith, Springfield

Title: There’s no Freedom in Fear

Medium: Drawing - copic marker

Wonder Woman was a box office smash on its opening weekend, raking in more than $100 million domestically — a new record for a movie directed by a woman.

Deadline reported Monday that the final tally for the film was $103.1 million, even higher than the initial Sunday estimates.

That handily defeats the previous record for a movie directed by a woman — $85.1 million for Sam Taylor-Johnson's Fifty Shades of Grey.

100 Expressions: Felicia Olin

Jun 5, 2017

Felicia Olin, Springfield

Title: "Portrait of Nawar al-Awlaki"

Medium: Mixed and acrylic

100 Expressions: Brian Willard

Jun 5, 2017

Brian Willard, Springfield

Title: "Ringed Planet 1.0"

Medium: Acrylic on canvas panel

Narrative: Given the war on science currently in the new administration, it is important for us to take a moment and remember its beauty.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

100 Expressions: David Brodsky

Jun 5, 2017

David Brodsky, Springfield

Title: "Premonition"

Medium: Photography

Richard Taylor

Title: "Harmony"

Medium: Oil on canvas

Narrative: A portrait of Donald Trump screaming in harmony with faces in flame. A reminder of the pain our society is feeling in harmony with presidential decree.

Patricia Myers, Springfield

Title: Big Hands

Medium: Acrylic

Narrative: It’s not so much a slight on a particular president’s hand size, but the standard by which we should go by. Unfortunately, President Trump and his administration don’t appear to have any standards at all.

James Hawker, Springfield

Title: "Untitled-1"

Medium: Photograph

Narrative: I am a photographer out working every day. These two are from what I have noticed so far. -J.H.

James Hawker, Springfield

Title: "Untitled-2"

Medium: Photography

100 Expressions: Erik Welch

Jun 5, 2017

Erik Welch, Springfield

Title: "Inter Sections"

Narrative: When change comes, we often resist, unsure how it will affect us. Instead of seeing this as shattering, these lines, drawn over many hours and days are meant to show depth and beauty. Sometimes we don’t know how things will turn at the beginning, but often there are clues if we look for the shape between the lines.

Erik Welch, Springfield

Title: "The Crash Course"

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Anyone hoping to get a sense of how former Fox News star Megyn Kelly might reinvent herself for her new role as NBC News' big hire didn't get a lot of clues from the rather conventional debut episode of Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly.

It was a program which came with some fanfare, particularly if you were watching NBC News platforms in the days leading up to Sunday's debut. MSNBC, Today and NBC Nightly News all broadcast previews of Sunday Night's big get, Kelly's sit-down last week with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Copyright 2017 WHYY. To see more, visit WHYY.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Alan Alda's father wanted him to become a doctor, but it wasn't meant to be. "I failed chemistry really disastrously ... " Alda says. "I really didn't want to be a doctor; I wanted to be a writer and an actor."

Which is exactly what happened, but Alda didn't leave science behind entirely. His new book, If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?, is all about communication — and miscommunication — between scientists and civilians.

The idea of reading a stranger's diary is thrilling, clandestine, a promise — that their inner life will roll out before you like a carpet, that you'll finally find out if other people feel the way you do.

And I love to read the journals of writers — Virginia Woolf's melancholy and precise pages, or George Eliot's nonchalant lists of Greek texts she'd read like other people read the newspaper.

There is a whole range of feelings that happen with the delivery of bad news. In my case, like many others, knees lock, the heart speeds up and the hairs on my arms get a funny little tingle. My circumstances, however, were a little less expected.

When my dad told my husband and me that he and my mom wanted to come into Manhattan for dinner, I was excited to see them and quickly made a plan for an 8 p.m. dinner at Café Orlin — my favorite for Middle Eastern food. As soon as we sat down, I knew something was very wrong.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Typically, India's Bollywood film industry depicts older women as maternal and virtuous. Younger ones often are eye candy, propping up male leads. But a recent crop of films is showing more complex female characters, training a spotlight exclusively on the lives of women — and, even more unusually, on their sexuality.

Late night host Bill Maher is under fire for using a racial slur on a live broadcast of his show Real Time on Friday.

During an interview with Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., about his new book, The Vanishing American Adult, Maher and Sasse were discussing adults who dress up for Halloween. Sasse said that happened less often in Nebraska, where the practice is "frowned upon."

This is the story of a 61-foot-tall duck that is being called a counterfeit of a different giant duck, which itself is a replica of a beloved bath toy.

Got that? Here we go.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A mother leaves her 9-year-old son locked in an airless apartment for a week with no food, water or light. He breaks out through a window, and police find him weak and bleeding; they also find his mother passed out in a nearby crack house.

Objects in the Mirror, a new play from American playwright Charles Smith, seems ripped from the headlines. It's about a young man who escapes war-torn Liberia only to confront new dangers and an identity crisis in Australia, the country where he found shelter.

It begins the way all great stories should: with a boy, a girl, a shotgun and a cheap motel room. 300 lightning bolt pages later, it ends the same way — a girl, a boy and a gun.

And in between White Fur, the new novel from Jardine Libaire, is ... I don't know what it is. Not so much a story as a fable. A fairy tale of love and class and money and death and New York City in the 1980's, as seen through eyes so new and so young that everything seems like magic all the time.

One taco is good, but two tacos are better. By that reasoning, hundreds of tacos should be incredible.

And Mike Sutter, food critic for the San Antonio Express-News, is now about halfway through his "365 Days of Tacos" quest to eat at a different taco joint every day for a year. So far, he's consumed about 700 tacos.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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