Arts & Life

Arts and lifestyle coverage from around the globe and Illinois.

Ways to Connect

The Philadelphia Eagles won the Super Bowl on Sunday night. You could be forgiven for not expecting it — it's never happened before. And on this historic occasion, Stephen Thompson and I sat down Monday morning to talk with some of our favorite panelists about the game and the surrounding entertainment. With us is Katie Presley, a New Orleans Saints fan without too much at stake in this game. But also with us is Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team. Gene is a longtime Eagles fan who had, in terms of fandom, a lot at stake in this game.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And now to that game that happened last night.

(SOUNDBITE OF SUPER BOWL LII)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: The Philadelphia Eagles are Super Bowl champions. Eagles fans everywhere, this is for you.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The Winter Olympics in South Korea will be a chance for the country to show off its newest robot creations. NPR's Elise Hu reports that the peek into the future starts as soon as you land at the airport.

An ad featuring King's words and voice has sparked debate over proper use of his speeches. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with David Garrow, author of Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Abigail Marsh is an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Georgetown University and author of the book The Fear Factor: How One Emotion Connects Altruists, Psychopaths, and Everyone In-Between. You can follow her on Twitter: @aa_marsh.


Individualism is that rugged frontier quality that reflects a mix of independence, valuing free expression, and eschewing close family ties relative to more distant relationships.

One of the world's leading investigators into the ivory trade, Esmond Bradley Martin, was found stabbed to death at his home in Kenya on Sunday, The Associated Press reports.

Nicolas Kamwende, head of criminal investigations in Nairobi, told the AP that a family member had gone to check on Bradley Martin after he failed to respond to phone calls, and found his body on a bed with stab wounds to the neck.

Bradley Martin's innovative work as a conservationist and investigator made him one of the global authorities on elephant and rhino poaching.

The world of artificial intelligence has exploded in recent years. Computers armed with AI do everything from drive cars to pick movies you'll probably like. Some have warned we're putting too much trust in computers that appear to do wondrous things.

But what exactly do people mean when they talk about artificial intelligence?

If you're a fan of thrillers, you know that they're defined by two extremes. At one end are the plot-driven worlds that work like clockwork machines (for instance, Murder on the Orient Express); at the other are the stories that sprawl outward to offer a portrait of the larger society (like James Ellroy's Los Angeles or Stieg Larsson's Sweden). As it turns out, I've recently come across an enjoyable example of each extreme.

Editor’s Note: This segment contains audio that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.


Composer Julius Eastman died homeless in 1990. Just 49 years old, he represented a promising future in avant-garde, minimalist classical music. As a black, openly gay man, he stood out from his largely white peers. He wrote challenging, political music with provocative titles. Much of that work was lost after he died, but historians have been piecing it back together.

Fanny Ortiz, a mother of five who lives just east of downtown Los Angeles, spent nearly a decade married to a man who controlled her and frequently threatened her. Then, she said, his abuse escalated.

"He would physically hit me in the face, throw me on the wall," she recalled.

People who are homeless in New York City will be the first in the country to have access to free vending machines, dispensing items like food, socks, shampoo, books and more.

The project started in January in Nottingham, England, as the brainchild of Huzaifah Khaled, founder of the British charity Action Hunger (@_actionhunger). Khaled joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the initiative.

The Winter Olympics begin this week in Pyeongchang, South Korea. An advance team of North Korean officials arrived Monday to prepare for the North’s participation in the games.

Ahead of Friday’s opening ceremony, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with NPR’s Elise Hu (@elisewho), who’s in Seoul.

What's Behind The Stock Market Sell-Off?

Feb 5, 2018

The Dow opened down Monday after having its worst day since the Brexit vote in June 2016 on Friday.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off,” about what’s happening.

Writer Maggie O'Farrell has survived some terrifying episodes. She's had a machete pressed to her throat during a robbery, once contracted amoebic dysentery while traveling and nearly bled out while giving birth to her first child.

All told, O'Farrell says she has experienced 17 different brushes with death — each of which she details in her new memoir, I Am, I Am, I Am.

A rocket more powerful than any other flying today is scheduled to blast off Tuesday for the first time, if all goes well.

In Gangnam, the upscale Seoul district south of the Han River bisecting the city, one of the area's biggest industries is evident on people's faces: On the streets, patients are wearing nose guards and bandages, fresh from facial fix-ups. High-rises soar with a cosmetic surgery clinic on every floor, and in the subway stations, floor-to-ceiling advertisements feature images of women's uniformly wide-eyed, youthful faces — all with the message that you, too, can look this way if you go to the right clinic.

Editor's Note: This story contains graphic language.

Ex-sports doctor Larry Nassar was handed his third sentence on Monday, this time of 40 to 125 years in prison after pleading guilty to molesting young gymnasts at an elite Michigan training facility.

Dozens of people gave victim statements last week in the Eaton County, Mich., courtroom. There, Randy Margraves, the father of two of them, charged at Nassar saying he wanted a minute alone with the "demon." Sheriff's deputies tackled him before he reached the former doctor.

Updated 12:40 p.m. ET

Third time's the charm. The Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England Patriots, 41 to 33, and claimed its first-ever Super Bowl title in Super Bowl LII on Sunday. The Birds had two other Super Bowl appearances to their names, in 1981, and 2005, when the Patriots beat them 24 - 21.

Backup quarterback Nick Foles led a 75-yard drive to the winning touchdown in the last three minutes of the game. A last-minute drive by the Patriots failed against the Eagles defense line, and the Eagles won 41 - 33.

The only known surviving member of the Islamic State terror cell suspected to be behind the deadly 2015 attacks on Paris was defiant in his first public appearance Monday in a Belgian courtroom.

"I do not wish to respond to any questions. I was asked to come. I came," Salah Abdeslam said in French, as translated by The Associated Press and Reuters. "I defend myself by staying silent."

When asked why he wouldn't stand, Abdeslam responded, according to reports: "I'm tired, I did not sleep."

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

The stock market went on a wild ride again on Monday, with the Dow Jones industrial average closing down 1,175 points, its worst point drop in history. The Dow closed down 4.6 percent and turned negative for the year.

At one point Monday afternoon, the Dow was down 1,579 points — the largest intraday point drop in the history of the index.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Faces Of NPR: N'Jeri Eaton

Feb 5, 2018

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what inspires them. This week's post features NPR's N'Jeri Eaton.

The Basics:

Name: N'Jeri Eaton

Job Title: Senior Manager of Programming Acquisitions

Where You're From: Many places but I lived in Oakland, CA the longest so I claim it as my home.

Lee Jae-yong, the de facto leader of the Samsung conglomerate best known for its electronics, walked free from a South Korean jail on Monday after a court reduced and suspended his five-year sentence on corruption charges handed down less than six months ago.

The appeals court reduced Lee's sentence to a suspended 2 1/2 years, dismissing most of the bribery and corruption charges. It suspended the sentence for four years, meaning Lee, who is also known as Jay Y. Lee, is unlikely to serve any more time.

Vice President Pence is heading to South Korea, where — in addition to representing the U.S. at the Olympics — he plans to counter North Korea's media messaging and push allies to maintain pressure on the rogue nation, according to multiple reports.

Pence is also visiting Japan on this trip to Asia.

Hasbro Announces 'Monopoly' For Cheaters

Feb 5, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pages