Marketplace

Weekdays 6:30-7 PM, replay 10:30-11 PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace  is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.  

Senate budget battle likely as vote looms

Oct 17, 2017

The Senate is expected to take up a budget framework this week. If it passes, the GOP will be one step closer to the tax overhaul it so desperately wants. President Donald Trump promised yesterday in a Rose Garden press conference with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that the tax plan is on track. But the outcome of the pending budget vote is far from predictable.

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Can Congress make consumer data safer?

Oct 17, 2017

The Senate Banking committee meets today for another hearing about the Equifax data breach. With the major credit reporting agencies woven deeply into the fabric of our financial system, what can Congress actually do here?

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A move from natural gas to electricity for homes

Oct 17, 2017

Not long ago natural gas – the fuel that probably gave you your hot shower this morning – was being hailed as the clean “bridge” fuel, because it polluted less than other alternatives. For some purposes it still is, such as when it replaces diesel fuel in buses. But in our homes, some now believe natural gas should be phased out in favor of electric appliances, for climate reasons.

10/17/2017: The fight to become Amazon's next home

Oct 17, 2017

(U.S. Edition) Canadian jet manufacturer Bombardier has been in an ongoing trade fight with America's Boeing. Well, now Bombardier is selling the majority stake of its C-series plane to the French company Airbus. We'll report on why the Canadian company went through with the deal and how it may be able to sidestep a high U.S. tariff as a result. Afterwards, we'll discuss whether Congress can help make consumer data safer, and then  look at Seattle's bid to become home to Amazon's second headquarters. 

Two dozen people zigzag through Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, footsteps crunching on pavement and gravel. A local blog called The Urbanist organized the tour about the history of this neighborhood — the location of Amazon’s first headquarters.

In a few years, the view around HQ1 has morphed from low-slung warehouses to tall, modern apartment buildings and cranes that poke out of construction sites around every bend.

“It looks like a millennial paradise,” said Seattle resident Anthony Bridgewater, who took the tour.

(Global Edition) From the BBC's World Service ... The partnership sees Airbus take a majority stake in Bombardier's C-Series jet and analysts say it could have huge implications for the industry. The planes can be assembled inside the U.S., potentially avoiding the crippling 300 percent import tariff the U.S. government wants to see imposed. The deal hasn't been welcomed by U.S. rival Boeing — they complain that the firms receive too much state support. In China, preparations are underway for the Communist Party Congress, which begins tomorrow.

In the past few years, venture capitalists have invested more than $1.6 billion into companies working with low-earth orbit technology. Some of those companies are making small satellites that orbit closer to Earth than traditional ones. The goal: to blanket Earth with broadband internet and gather data on the planet. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks to the innovators behind this mission.

Belgian researchers have identified a vulnerability in the way most of us connect wirelessly to the internet. The weakness even has a name: Krack. If exploited (and luckily that has not yet happened, as far as anyone can tell), information like our credit cards, passwords, basically anything we type is at risk for being seen and stolen. For businesses trying to keep their data and yours safe, this opens up a whole new front in the cybersecurity war. 

My Economy: Anxious about medical bills down the road

Oct 16, 2017

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

Today’s installment is from Irwin Kwan, a user experience designer in Massachusetts.

The White House released a paper today laying out the argument that a corporate tax cut will give a $4,000 boost to the average household. The studies being used to back up its assertion come from reputable places like the Kansas City Fed and Harvard, although there are plenty of other studies that say otherwise. The merits of the corporate tax cut and who it benefits is setting up to be a battle of the academics over some complex models predicting how companies might behave.

Social Security benefits will rise 2 percent in 2018 for approximately 61 million older Americans who rely on the benefit. The annual cost-of-living adjustment is based on the third-quarter Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. The COLA hasn’t been as high as 2 percent since 2011; it rose 0.3 percent this year and didn't increase at all in 2016. Low inflation in recent years has helped seniors financially, since many are on fixed incomes. But the rate of inflation in the health care sector has exceeded overall consumer price inflation in recent years.

Many nonprofits are shaking in their boots at the prospect of a GOP tax plan that would decrease incentives for giving, especially for individuals in lower tax brackets. And as the smoke begins to clear from massive wildfires in Northern California (some of which are still active), we examine the failure of maps that show places most at risk for wildfires. One neighborhood that burned last week was Coffey Park, a subdivision in the middle of Santa Rosa — the type of place that everyone assumed would be safe from wildfires.

Over the past week, Northern California has seen some horrific fires blaze across its neighborhoods. One of the remarkable things about those fires, in addition to their speed and the scale of the destruction, is what buildings burned and where those buildings were.

The Tubbs Fire, which hit the city of Santa Rosa, has burned more than 35,000 acres. It was 70 percent contained as of today, according to Cal Fire.

Ira Belgrade had been a Hollywood talent manager for decades when his wife, who was also his business partner, died suddenly from Lyme disease.  

“I fell apart, my business fell apart,” Belgrade said.  “How was I going to tell my 2 1/2-year-old, 'Now we’ve got to move, you can’t have that bedroom anymore'?

10/16/2017: Preventing distracted driving

Oct 16, 2017

(Markets Edition) The Federal Reserve still wants another interest rate hike or two. Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives, joined us to discuss why Fed Chair Janet Yellen has been pushing for them. Afterwards, we'll look at the issue of distracted driving, which causes more than 3,000 deaths a year. We now have software that will allow police to scan a driver's phone for activity.

Colin Kaepernick says the NFL colluded against him

Oct 16, 2017

Colin Kaepernick — the football player who started kneeling during the national anthem to protest social injustice — has now filed a grievance against the NFL, accusing its teams of colluding against him.

He opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March, and no team has signed him despite a strong season last year. That's led to speculation in the sports community that he’s been blackballed by the NFL because of his political activism.

(U.S. Edition) Colin Kaepernick — the football player who began kneeling during the national anthem to protest social injustice — has filed a grievance against the NFL, claiming that the league's teams colluded to keep him from getting a new contract. On today's show, we'll look at what the league's collective bargaining agreement means for his case. Afterwards, we'll discuss Alibaba's plan to double its spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years.

In 2011, Ben Lieberman got the call every parent dreads. His college age son had been in a car accident and later diedLieberman was told the driver fell asleep at the wheel. But the accident happened during rush hour – on a windy road. So Lieberman wondered if the driver had been texting but says he was shocked at how difficult that can be to investigate. 

“I learned the hard way that there’s really no system in place right now," he said. 

Chinese internet giant Alibaba is taking a big step toward competing globally. It plans to more than double spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years, and will open labs in seven cities around the world, including in Russia, Singapore and in the U.S. But can its dominance of the Chinese market translate into international success?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

10/16/2017: European investors weigh new risks

Oct 16, 2017

(Global Edition) From the BBC's World Service ... European investors are waking up to the return of political risk -- another showdown over Catalonia is playing out and Austria has elected the world’s youngest leader, with fears over immigration helping bring Sebastian Kurz to power. We examine the implications for Europe. Tensions have flared in the oil rich region around Kirkuk, with Iraqi forces saying they have captured the disputed city from Kurdish fighters. But how crucial is the area to the world’s oil supply?

Microsoft recently announced that it’s doing away with its Windows Phone operating system. That basically leaves consumers with two options: iPhone or Android. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Julie Ask, a principal analyst at Forrester Research, about how the smartphone industry got here and what it would take for a third player to enter the market. 

Here at NPR Illinois, we've been concerned we might have to drop some programs due to the ongoing budget impasse.  

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