Invisibilia

Thursdays 8-9 PM

NPR Illinois is airing a special run of Invisibilia.

Invisibilia is Latin for "invisible things." The program explores the unseen forces that shape human behavior -- things like ideas, beliefs, assumptions and emotions -- interweaving narrative storytelling with scientific research that will ultimately make you see your own life differently. The show is co-hosted by a trio of NPR's award-winning journalists, Alix Spiegel, Lulu Miller and Hanna Rosin, who have roots at This American Life, Radiolab and The Atlantic.

Invisibilia shows us how science sheds light on what we individually experience and delves more often into how our lives are entwined, sometimes invisibly, with each other and the larger world.

True You

Jun 23, 2017

Thanks to the following musicians:

Future Self

Jun 21, 2017

This episode contains some disturbing content and might not be appropriate for some listeners.

Special thanks to the following musicians:

The Culture Inside

Jun 14, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Reality Part One

Jun 7, 2017

Thanks to:

Reality Part Two

Jun 7, 2017

We'd like to thank the following musicians:

  • Julianna Barwick and Suicide Squeeze Records and SubPop Licensing for letting us use the song "Call"
  • Peals for their song "Wild Honey"
  • Crazy P for "Errinerige"

Emotions Part Two

May 31, 2017

Note: In this show, we refer to a group of people who live in the Philippines. The name of the group has multiple valid English spellings, including Ifugal and Ifugao. We have opted for the former pronunciation for our story.

We'd like to thank the following musicians:

  • Linnea S. - Her Presence is Strong Here
  • Myriadar - Cart Before the Horse

Emotions Part One

May 31, 2017

To learn more about the theory of constructed emotion and the work of neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett, check out her book How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain.

Special thanks to the following musicians:

  • Helena Ahlbäck (formerly of The Broken Assembly) - "Emotional"

Season 3 Trailer

May 18, 2017

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Meet the Contributors

Jul 31, 2016

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Read the Transcript

Jul 29, 2016

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

HANNA ROSIN, HOST:

When he was in college, the thing that annoyed Brett Cohen the most was celebrity culture.

Featured Music

Jul 29, 2016

Most of the music in this episode was obtained from NPR's licensed music libraries. But we are always on the hunt for awesome new music or original work by musicians! If that's you, write to us on Facebook or at invisibiliamail@npr.org and your music could be featured here!

Explore the Episode

Jul 29, 2016

Read the Transcript

Jul 22, 2016

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

HANNA ROSIN, HOST:

Let's begin on October 31.

HANNA ROSIN AND LULU MILLER: Halloween.

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #1: Trick or treat.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Trick or treat.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Happy Halloween.

Featured Music

Jul 22, 2016

Special thanks to musicians Kai Engel and Lee Rosevere, whose music was used under a Creative Commons attribution license.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nazi's Shirt

Jul 22, 2016

Hanna Rosin has a story about Martin Greenfield, a tailor in Brooklyn who has dressed the last three presidents, and a host of celebrities – Donald Trump, Michael Jackson, Shaquille O'Neal. He learned how to sew when the SS put him to work in the tailor shop at Auschwitz, where he did an amazing thing. After he ripped the shirt of a Nazi officer, and took a beating for it, Martin decided to take the shirt for himself. No other prisoners had a shirt under their uniform but he kept his, throughout the rest of the war.

Shoes

Jul 22, 2016

A short comedic essay by contributor Colin Dwyer who proposes that maybe shoes are to blame, for pollution, climate change, violence, and all the other acts of human insensitivity. Because the moment we slipped a surface between ourselves and the ground, we lost our intimate connection with the earth.

Read the Transcript

Jul 15, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ALIX SPIEGEL, HOST:

This story starts in Washington, D.C., on a warm summer night. There were eight friends gathered around a backyard dinner table. They were toasting family and friendship. And everybody was having a good time.

Featured Music

Jul 15, 2016

Explore the Episode

Jul 15, 2016

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Explore the Episode

Jul 8, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Featured Music

Jul 8, 2016

Read the Transcript

Jul 8, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

HANNA ROSIN, HOST:

So let's go back to World War II.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: America goes to war to save the homes and ideals of free men from Axis domination.

ROSIN: America was fighting a terrible dictator determined to take over Europe.

Mental illness has been part of human society throughout recorded history, but how we care for people with mental disorders has changed radically, and not always for the better.

In Colonial days, settlers lived in sparsely populated rural communities where sanctuary and community support enabled the tradition of family care brought from England. "Distracted persons" were acknowledged, but erratic behavior wasn't associated with disease.

Explore the Episode

Jul 1, 2016

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Read the Transcript

Jul 1, 2016

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LULU MILLER, HOST:

So let's begin today with the American dream achieved. Gifford Briggs had found himself a beautiful wife.

JENNIFER BRIGGS: My name is Jennifer Briggs.

MILLER: A beautiful home, a great job.

GIFFORD BRIGGS: I work in construction.

MILLER: And then they had a daughter.

Meet the Experts

Jul 1, 2016

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editors' note: It's Invisibilia bonus time! Sometimes we've got more wonderful stories than we can fit into the Invisibilia show and podcast. But we can't let them go. This story is being heard exclusively on NPR's Morning Edition.

At the center of Geel, a charming Belgian town less than an hour's drive from of Antwerp, is a church dedicated to Dymphna, a saint believed to have the power to cure mental disorders. It's a medieval church with stone arches, spires and a half-built bell tower, and it has inspired an unusual centuries-old practice: For over 700 years, residents of Geel have been accepting people with mental disorders, often very severe mental disorders, into their homes and caring for them.

The latest episode of the podcast Invisibilia explores the idea that personality — something a lot of us think of as immutable — can change over time.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt from the latest episode of the Invisibilia podcast and program, which is broadcast on participating public radio stations. This story contains language that some may find offensive.

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