Illinois Edition

Weekdays Noon-1 PM, rebroadcast 7-8 PM

The news in Illinois that affects you is delivered daily on Illinois Edition.  Politics, education, the arts and life -- it's Illinois.  Explained.  The newsmakers and people of Illinois that are making waves make the airwaves daily.

Listen to broadcasts on:

  • NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS, Springfield (central Illinois)
  • NPR Illinois | 89.3 IPA, Pittsfield (west central Illinois)
  • 580 WILL-AM, Urbana (east central Illinois)

Special segments air weekly:

Thursdays

  • The Scene, which explores the arts across Illinois; from cultural happenings to the artists and musicians.

Fridays

  • State Week, where the panel dissects the past week in Illinois politics and updates listeners with insider information from the state capital in Springfield.

Illinois Edition began airing on a daily basis in 2012.

Larissa Kramer

Ususally, Roger Ebert's Film Festival aka Ebertfest honors a person. This year however, it chose to recognize Champaign county's Alliance for Inclusion and Respect. The organization helps fund mental health and disability organizations.

Rachel Otwell

This week we have another conversation from Champaign, this time with a self-proclaimed townie who keeps himself more than busy when it comes to creative culture in the Champaign-Urbana area. As Seth Fein tells us in this interview, after a stint running The Accord venue, previously The Highdive, he'll be focusing on other projects, like the online magazine he co-founded, hyper-local "Smile Politely."

Warehouse Workers for Justice

Legislation aims to improve working conditions for temporary workers as the need for them increases.

History: News Of Titanic Sinking Shook Springfield

Apr 19, 2017

It was just about 105 years ago when the luxury liner Titanic sank on April 15, 1912. The disaster made news around the world. 

On Illinois Edition, we hear an excerpt from this presentation which took place earlier this month.

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

This week Scott and Rachel travel to Champaign where they meet Austin McCann, he's the general manager/programmer (or anti-programmer as he calls it) of the Art Theater Co-op which specializes in "community theater" in a 104-year-old building. Tune in to hear what they're all about!

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Ever since the crisis in Flint, Michigan was publicized, concern over the presence of lead in water has reached a fever pitch. Law makers across the country have reacted with legislation addressing the issue in their home states. Illinois is one of them - a new law requires some public schools to test for it.

ALPLM

John Wilkes Booth is a villain in history.  Yet, he had a prominent spot in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield.

Since the facility opened in 2005, a sinister statue of Booth shadowed the Lincoln family as visitors entered the main plaza.  But no more.  

Illinois Issues: LGBT In The Time Of Trump

Apr 13, 2017
Equality Illinois

As rapid-fire change comes at the federal level, advocates want  to keep Illinois' status as one of the leading states in offering protections.

Alex McCray didn’t want to believe Donald Trump had won the election. In the words of the transgender nursing student from downstate Sherman: “I was hoping it was all just one terrible nightmare. It felt like my rights were being ripped out right from underneath me.”

facebook.com/Kumler-Outreach-Ministries

Over the weekend a facility providing services to the needy, including a food pantry and prescription medication service, was severely vandalized. 

Reps. Darlene Senger and Elaine Nekritz
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The Illinois criminal justice system has become increasingly reliant on fees. People convicted of crimes have become money makers for state and local government — paying for everything from prosecutors' offices to new police cars.

Carter Staley / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

With multiple legislative proposals, a task force and a lawsuit all aimed at overhauling the way Illinois funds its schools, it’s hard to predict what might happen. But in this chat that aired on Tuesday, our Capitol Bureau reporter Brian Mackey makes me try.  

Credit Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Lawmakers have been trying to change the way Illinois funds schools for years now, with no luck. But a new plan called the Evidence Based Model seems to be gaining momentum.

Imagine you’re a farmer and it’s time to decide what to plant. You need information on supply, demand, prices, outlook -- information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, university extension services, even economists at the Federal Reserve.

KevinDooley/flickr

There are plenty of scary climate change predictions about what could be coming our way in the future.  So what is a person to do?  Move to Michigan.  

The Illinois Innocence Project, based at the University of Illinois Springfield, has exonerated ten clients so far. They have over 2,000 prisoners seeking their services, and about 40 cases they are currently working on. The group has a limited staff plus volunteers who are largely comprised of students and lawyers working pro bono. Executive Director, John Hanlon, joined us to talk about recent developments and upcoming events. 

CREDIT SIU.EDU

The Southern Illinois University Board of Trustees last week pushed off a major financial decision.

The Scene Meets Capital City Improv

Apr 6, 2017
courtesy

This week on The Scene Scott and Rachel talk with Drew Stroud, a founder and member of a new comedy group. Capital City Improv's first show is at The Legacy Theatre in Springfield on Saturday night.

courtesy

The name was chosen on a whim - because no one else would have it. That was over five decades ago. The band's initial success came after winning a contest that got them a record contract.

Barbara Wheeler headshot
Illinois General Assembly

In a way, it's just one little box on a lengthy college application form. But for many would-be students, that box is more of a stop sign if the instructions say "check here if you have a criminal record." State Rep. Barbara Wheeler, a Republican from Crystal Lake, wants to change that. She sat down with our Education Desk reporter Dusty Rhodes to explain why.

Illinois State capitol building in the fog / rain
Amanda Vinicky / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

As Illinois enters its 22nd month without a real budget, the state services most affected by the political fight include those that help victims of domestic violence.

Zach Savich and Hilary Plum headshots with book covers
Courtesy Zach Savich and Hilary Plum

Zach Savich and Hilary Plum, a married couple and awarded and acclaimed authors, will share their memoirs in Springfield on Thursday April 6th.

Bee on a pink flower
Dun.can / flickr

Want to add some beauty to your yard while also doing something beneficial for wildlife?  Native plants are a good choice.

courtesy

On Monday, a trio called The Peoria Three will present at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield. 

An annual event helps kids express and cope with the pain of losing a loved one. Staab Funeral Homes and Counseling Associates of Springfield have joined forces to present the ‘Kids Good Grief Camp.’ There’s one taking place this Sunday. 

Illinois Issues: This State's Abortion Debate

Mar 30, 2017
U.S. Supreme Court exterior
Brittany Hogan / flickr

Bill aims to protect abortion rights on the chance Roe v. Wade  is overturned.

With Democrats in firm control of the Illinois General Assembly, abortion rights might seem to be safe in the state. But what would happen if the U.S. Supreme Court overturned its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which made abortion legal across the country in 1973?

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Last month, a Springfield police officer named Samuel Rosario beat a resident of east Springfield. It was captured by a body camera. Rosario is facing charges and is on unpaid leave. 

A video of Springfield police Officer Samuel Rosario beating up a 19 year old on the east side of Springfield has gone viral - it was captured by a body camera.

NPR

Cairo is at the bottom of Illinois. And not just geographically.  Poverty is high in a town mired in one of the most de-populating counties in the U.S. 

investigatinginnocence.org

Earlier this month, Quincy native Curtis Lovelace was found not guilty after the second trial that accused him of killing his first wife, Cory Lovelace. Curtis served as a prosecutor and before that played football for the U of I. His former wife was also a college grad, and a stay-at-home mom for their four children. 

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