Pre-K Education

Oct 13, 2017
Originally published on October 13, 2017 10:16 am

For ages 3 and up: Every answer in this quiz will be something you learned in school, but we've changed one letter to a K. For example, the sequence of changes an organism goes through from birth to death, and the positive social media feedback it receives in the process would be the, "LIKE cycle," Changing one letter in "LIFE cycle" to a K.

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Hey, Jonathan.

JONATHAN COULTON: Hey, Ophira.

EISENBERG: So today we're playing a game about fashion - so fashion speed round. What do you call a garment with a waistline just below the bust line?

COULTON: That is an empire waist.

EISENBERG: That is right. What do you call the diagonal direction of a woven fabric?

COULTON: That's called the bias.

EISENBERG: Correct again. And finally, what is NPR's dress code?

COULTON: Non-profit fabulous.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

COULTON: From NPR and WNYC, coming to you from the Bell House in beautiful Brooklyn, N.Y., it's NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and trivia, ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm Jonathan Coulton. Now here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Thank you, Jonathan. We have a great show for you. Four brilliant contestants are backstage discussing their hatred of punny Halloween costumes. I'm looking at you, Freudian slip.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Today our guest is Adam Conover, the host of TruTV's optimistically titled show "Adam Ruins Everything." And Adam plays a friendly know-it-all who debunks people's commonly held conceptions of fun things - diamonds, wine, vacations. He's a little bit nerdy but generally right, which means he's pretty much like everybody on our staff and all of our contestants.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So he's going to fit right in. Our first two contestants will play a game where they go back to school, and that's school with a K to make it cooler.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Let's meet them - first up, June Chin on buzzer number one.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're from Greenwich, Conn., where you're a stay-at-home mom with three sons.

JUNE CHIN: Yes.

EISENBERG: Welcome.

CHIN: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Seth Wallin on buzzer number two.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're a financial analyst for an advertising company. Welcome.

SETH WALLIN: Thank you - excited to be here.

EISENBERG: June and Seth, the first of you who wins two of our games will go on to our final round. So let's start with a word game called pre-K education. Every answer is going to be something you learned in school, but we've changed one letter to a K. So let's go to Jonathan Coulton for an example.

COULTON: If we said in biology, the sequence of changes an organism goes through from birth to death and the positive social media feedback it receives in the process, you would answer like cycle, changing one letter of life cycle to a K.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Just like pre-K, as easy as pre-K.

COULTON: It's as easy as pre-K. It's not going to be a problem.

EISENBERG: And here we go. In science, this theory states that the universe began from one singularity then exploded into a gigantic financial institution.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: June.

CHIN: The big bank theory.

EISENBERG: Yes. Sure, that works.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

COULTON: In 10th grade English, Chaucer wrote this 14th-century collection of medieval stories about trendy, leafy vitamin-K-rich vegetables.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Seth.

WALLIN: "The Canterbury Kale."

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And if that is not the name of a vegetarian restaurant in Brooklyn, Austin, Ann Arbor, Portland...

COULTON: It's a medieval-themed vegetarian restaurant.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: (Laughter) Vegetarian restaurant - it's a good idea. In world history, this monarch's version of the Bible is the most widely published book in history, and he had a cramp in his neck.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: June.

CHIN: King James - Kink James Bible.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Answer is Kink James. We wrote a clue to be nice and family friendly.

COULTON: That's right.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: In music class, it's a simple beginner's wind instrument that children can use to reseal a wine bottle.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: June.

CHIN: A recorker.

COULTON: That's right.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: My question is, why didn't you finish the bottle?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: What happened?

COULTON: Yeah. What's wrong with you?

EISENBERG: I mean you still made it to work.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: In philosophy, Plato wrote this parable about people who have never seen anything except the shadows of sweet baked goods served at birthday parties.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Seth.

WALLIN: The cake.

EISENBERG: OK. I like what...

WALLIN: "The Allegory Of The Cake."

EISENBERG: Yes, yes, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I'm glad you did that because I - it's hard to be like, no, we're not looking for just the cake.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Although, I know what you were doing.

WALLIN: I was about to phrase that as a question, too.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

WALLIN: That's not here.

COULTON: Please don't do that.

EISENBERG: Right. That's when you - no, that's when you get everything deducted.

COULTON: That's right.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: In literature, this group of counterculture writers including William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg had hard, birdlike projections on their faces.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Seth.

WALLIN: The beaks.

COULTON: The beaks is correct.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is your last clue. In language arts, this literary device provides a suggestion of things to come, specifically which eating utensil a character will use.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: June.

CHIN: Forkshadowing.

EISENBERG: Yeah, you got it.

(SOUNDBITE OF GAP DREAM'S "COLLEGE MUSIC")

EISENBERG: Puzzle Guru Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

ART CHUNG: They did great in a really tough game. June, well done. You're one step closer to the final round.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.