NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board Advice and Recommendations

TO:        Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois

FROM:   NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board

RE:        Advice and Recommendations CPB Grant Report

DATE:    March 3, 2017

NPR Illinois (WUIS) secures a Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) Community Service Grant each year to support our operations.  It accounts for 12% of our budget on average.  The grant compliance includes:

Grantees other than those owned by a state, a political or special purpose subdivision of a state or a public agency must have a Community Advisory Board (CAB) (47 U.S.C. § 396(k)(8)).  The CAB responsibilities include:

  • The right to review the station’s programming goals
  • The right to review the service provided by the station
  • The right to review significant policy decisions rendered by the station
  • The obligation to advise the station’s governing body on whether the station’s programming and other significant policies are meeting the specialized educational and cultural needs of the communities served by the station, and to make recommendations that the CAB deems appropriate to meet such needs.

 

Although NPR Illinois is licensed to a special purpose subdivision of a state, the Board or Trustees of the University of Illinois, the station management and the community advisory board (CAB) see providing this report as a best practice for public media.

The NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board has reviewed the programming goals, service, and significant policy decisions of NPR Illinois and finds them responsive to the educational and cultural needs of the community.

The NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board has reviewed the programming goals, service, and significant policy decisions of NPR Illinois and finds them responsive to the educational and cultural needs of the community.

The CAB recommends NPR Illinois:

  1. Develop a greater emphasis on stories talking to specific individuals about how the Illinois budget impasse has directly affected their lives. Putting a human voice to the stand-off in the capitol will give listeners examples of tangible effects of the state’s failure to pass a budget. These stories may better illustrate the impact to currently unaffected Illinoisans.
  2. Continue reporting that contrasts and bridges the rural/urban profile of Illinois.  The location of NPR Illinois in a less densely populated area than stations in Chicago or on the coasts situates the station to report the perceptions, culture, needs, and aspirations of Illinois residents. This coverage serves as a strength for the station and a resource for stations located in urban areas.  Many major media miss these non-urban areas. Part of the media’s 2016 post-election self-analysis indicated this need.
  3. Include a diversity of voices in sources and staff.  This should be done through engagement, recruitment, and the development of a residency/educational training pipeline in partnership with the Springfield campus.