Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The founders of the political research firm that commissioned the infamous Russia dossier on Donald Trump say they were "shocked" by the things they say it uncovered and want their full story to be public.

If you live anywhere along the U.S. East Coast, brace yourself for what is about to come: a nor'easter that forecasters are calling a "bomb cyclone."

How much the storm affects the coast is contingent on a number of factors, most notably how far out to sea it tracks.

U.S. coal mines recorded 15 workplace deaths in 2017 only a year after they hit a record low, according to Mine Safety and Health Administration data released on Tuesday.

In 2016, just nine deaths occurred in U.S. coal mines.

West Virginia mines saw eight deaths, Kentucky had two, and one each occurred at mines in Alabama, Colorado, Montana, Pennsylvania and Wyoming.

Updated at 1:55 a.m. ET

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are once again publicly comparing the size of their respective nuclear arsenals, with the president tweeting that the U.S. "nuclear button" is "much bigger & more powerful" than the one controlled by Pyongyang.

Iran's Supreme leader Ali Khamenei, speaking for the first time since protests broke out in his country last week, accuses "enemies of Iran" of meddling in the country.

At least 21 people have been killed in the protests that broke out throughout cities across the country since last Thursday, over Iran's weak economy and rising food prices.

Pakistan says it is preparing a response to President Trump, who wrote in a New Year's Day tweet that Islamabad was giving Washington only "lies & deceit" in exchange for billions of dollars in U.S. aid.

In the tweet, Trump accused Pakistan – a key U.S. anti-terrorism ally — of taking American leaders for "fools" and providing terrorists from neighboring Afghanistan "safe haven."

In an apparent reference to the $33 billion in aid that Trump says the U.S. has "foolishly" given Pakistan over the past 15 years, he signed off his tweet: "No more!"

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One of two Milwaukee-area girls charged in the 2014 attempted murder of a classmate to impress a fictional horror character known as "Slender Man" was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in a mental hospital.

Anissa Weier, 16, had pleaded guilty in August to being a party to attempted second-degree homicide. However, a jury agreed in September with her claim that she was not responsible for her actions because of mental illness.

A warming planet due to human-induced climate change is likely to contribute to an increase in volcanic activity, according to

Doug Jones, the senator-elect from Alabama, says the campaign against his Republican rival, Roy Moore, was "surreal," but that ultimately, the tumultuous election came down to "kitchen table issues."

The Democrat's comments, during an appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers early Friday, came as his opponent in the Dec. 12 special election to replace the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions had yet to concede — a full 10 days after the vote.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull called a vehicle attack that injured 19 people at an intersection in downtown Melbourne on Thursday a "shocking crime," that was nonetheless only an "isolated incident."

The alleged driver, 32-year-old Saeed Noori, is an Australian citizen of Afghan descent. He was arrested at the scene after allegedly driving an SUV through a crowd of holiday shoppers in the southern Australian city.

John Schnatter, the founder of the Papa John's pizza chain, will step down as CEO in the wake of controversial comments he made last month about the NFL's handling of the anthem protests.

Schnatter will be replaced on Jan. 1 by the company's chief operating officer, Steve Ritchie. Schnatter will remain chairman of the board.

The Royal Australian Navy's first submarine, which went down with all hands more than a century ago, has been located off Papua New Guinea in about 1,000 feet of water.

HMAS AE-1 vanished off Rabaul, Papua New Guinea, in the Duke of York islands on Sept. 14, 1914, less than three months after the start of World War I. The vessel had 35 crew aboard — Australians, British and one New Zealander.

Twelve previous government-funded searches over the years had failed to locate the submarine.

A car park in the English city of Leicester, where the remains of King Richard III were discovered five years ago, is now a protected monument.

Specifically, the location has been given scheduled monument status and described as "one of the most important sites in [the U.K.'s] ... national history."

Richard III famously met his fate on Aug. 22, 1485, at the climactic Battle of Bosworth, which ended the War of the Roses and ushered in England's House of Tudor.

Updated at 6:50 a.m. ET

A ferry in the Philippines carrying 251 passengers and seven crew capsized and sank off the northeastern province of Quezon, killing at least four people. Authorities said seven people were still missing in rough seas.

The Philippine Coast Guard says the Mercraft 3 inter-island ferry operating between Infanta and Polillo island, sank about 40 miles east of the capital, Manila, in heavy seas and strong winds.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

An SUV plowed through a group of pedestrians during rush hour Thursday in the city of Melbourne, injuring at least 19 people, in what police believe was a "deliberate act."

Two people are in custody after the incident near Flinders Street train station at about 4:45 p.m. local time in the southern Australian city of nearly 4 million people.

Another North Korean soldier has crossed the heavily fortified Demilitarized Zone that separates North and South in a dramatic escape, the second such defection in just over a month, South Korea's Defense Ministry says.

NPR's Rob Schmitz, citing a Defense Ministry official, says the low-ranking North Korean soldier crossed over just after 8 a.m. local time on Thursday as a thick layer of fog hung over the area.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency reports:

The Goodines of New Brunswick, Canada, will be spending Christmas apart for the first time in seven decades after the nursing home where the couple lived decided it was time to move 91-year-old Herbert Goodine to another facility.

The plight of the couple, married for 69 of their 73 years together, has sparked outrage in Canada after photos of their last moments together went viral on social media.

The United Nations human rights investigator assigned to Myanmar says she is being barred access to the country, where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled what the U.N. describes as ethnic cleansing.

Yanghee Lee, a U.N. special rapporteur who works with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, says she has been told that the Myanmar government will neither cooperate with her nor grant her access to the country for the remainder of her tenure.

Although candidate Donald Trump had little good to say about China, by the time President Trump visited Beijing as part of his Asian tour last month, he was touting the "great chemistry" enjoyed with Chinese leader Xi Jinping.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

The National Transportation Safety Board says an Amtrak passenger train that derailed from an overpass south of Tacoma, Wash., leaving three people dead, was traveling at 80 mph in a 30 mph zone.

Updated at 9:35 a.m. ET

The White House has publicly blamed North Korea for a ransomware attack in May that locked more than 300,000 computers in 150 countries.

There is a new world record for sailing solo around the world: 42 days, 16 hours, 40 minutes and 35 seconds. If verified, it is more than 6 days faster than the previous record, set a year earlier.

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET

Firefighters battling the massive Thomas Fire northwest of Los Angeles were working against another round of high winds to prevent its spread to homes in Santa Barbara and Montecito.

The blaze — which has gone on for two weeks and engulfed some 269,000 acres — has become the third largest wildfire in the state's modern history.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

South Africa's Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa has been chosen to become the new part chief of the African National Congress, placing him in position to succeed President Jacob Zuma in 2019 elections. Ramaphosa beat out former cabinet minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma for the post.

It is a pivotal moment for the ANC, the 105-year-old freedom movement once led by President Nelson Mandela in the fight against apartheid. However, Zuma's two terms have been marred by scandal and accusations of corruption.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET

Weeks after a deadlocked and disputed presidential election, a special court declared incumbent Juan Orlando Hernandez the winner by a razor-thin margin.

In a nationwide television broadcast, Electoral court president David Matamoros declared Hernandez the winner over his television star rival Salvador Nasralla, saying "We have fulfilled our obligation [and] we wish for there to be peace in our county."

The official winning margin was just 1.53 percentage points — 42.95 for Hernandez, 41.42 for Nasralla.

Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson announced Sunday that he would put his team up for sale at the end of the season after the National Football League said it was opening an investigation into accusations of workplace misconduct against him.

"I believe that it is time to turn the franchise over to new ownership," Richardson, 81, said in a statement on the team's website. "Therefore, I will put the team up for sale at the end of this NFL season."

Britain's senior-most military officer is warning that an improving Russian navy poses risks to undersea communications and Internet cables, saying any disruption could do "catastrophic" damage to the economy.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach said Britain and NATO need to prioritize protecting communications cables running along the seabed between countries and continents to prevent them being severed.

In a far-reaching report on child sex abuse in Australia, a government commission is recommending that the country's Catholic Church lift its celibacy requirement for diocesan clergy and be required to report evidence of abuse revealed in confession.

Those are among the 400 recommendations contained in the 17-volume final report of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sex Abuse, which is wrapping up a five-year investigation – the longest in Australia's history.

At least 6,700 Rohingya Muslims were killed in what has been described as "ethnic cleansing" in Myanmar's Rakhine state over a one-month period between August and September, according to the international aid group Doctors Without Borders.

Pages