Jacqualine Simone Williams

2015 Public Affairs Reporting Program Graduate Intern

Jacqualine Simone Williams is a graduate student in the Public Affairs Reporting program at the University of Illinois Springfield. She spent 15 years as an independent reporter with the Milwaukee Courier and was an intern with Milwaukee Public Radio, WUWM. She is a graduate of Columbia College in Chicago.

Ways to Connect

Jacqualine Simone Williams

 

In the wake of police shootings of black men and other incidents, there is a resurgence of young activists speaking out across the country.

Two Springfield artists, Ayo Abitogun and Sammy Flores, seek change through spoken word and music.  Jacqualine Simone Williams sat down to talk with them about their work. 

Sarah Jane Rhee

In Illinois, thousands of African American men are released from prison each year. But, without support from government and community, many will go back. 

As the fight over Illinois’ budget drags on, an addiction treatment program for juveniles and an anti-violence program, which both saw their state funding cut off earlier this year, still wait for a lifeline.

Bruce Rauner at Inauguration 2015
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

A number of recall petitions from people dissatisfied with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner are circulating on social media platforms, but these efforts do not meet the legal requirements for recall in the state.

Chicago Coalition for the Homeless

Illinois lawmakers were not able to reach an agreement on the state’s budget in the spring session. However, both chambers managed to approve a number of bills that could make it easier for those with criminal records to secure jobs or at least get a foot in the door.

Amanda Vinicky

Small-business owners are giving mixed reviews regarding the latest Senate proposal designed to slowly raise the minimum wage and cushion payroll costs. The legislation, which passed the Senate earlier this month and now pending in the House, would immediately bring the minimum wage from $8.25 to $9 an hour and then increase it by 50 cents per year until it reached $11  in 2019. The climb in wages would happen more gradually than called for under previous bills from sponsor Sen. Kimberly Lightford, a Maywood Democrat.