Felix Contreras

Felix Contreras is co-host of Alt.Latino, NPR's web-based program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture. It features music as well as interviews with many of the most well-known Latino musicians, actors, film makers and writers.

Previously, Contreras was a producer and reporter for NPR's Arts Desk and covered, among other stories and projects: a series reported from Mexico introducing the then-new musical movement called Latin Alternative; a series of stories on the financial challenges facing aging jazz musicians; and helped produce NPR's award winning series 50 Great Voices.

He once stood on the stage of the legendary jazz club The Village Vanguard after interviewing the club's owner and swears he felt the spirits of Coltrane and Monk walking through the room.

Contreras is a recovering television journalist who has worked for both NBC and Univision. He's also a part-time musician who plays Afro-Cuban percussion with various jazz and Latin bands.

Some say you have to have loved and lost to appreciate the beauty of the bolero. Since its inception in Cuba in the early 20th century, the music has been designed for thoughtful and emotional consideration of the joys and pains that come with loving someone so intensely, it becomes like a religion to adore that special someone (an actual bolero lyric).

Lila Downs has spent her career exploring the furthest reaches of Mexican folk music. With a voice that borrows heavily from opera, Downs performs the kind of full-throated mariachi singing that would fit right in at Mexico City's Garibaldi Square — ground zero for mariachi.

Each year on Jazz Piano Christmas, we celebrate with one of the most beloved holiday traditions, music. This year, we add another sacred tradition common to every community: family. The stage at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington Dec. 10 was overflowing with love as father-daughter and husband-wife duos let fly with love for each other and the holiday canon.

When singer Alsarah left her native Sudan, she was just a child who'd shown an interest in music. She's said it served as her coping mechanism during a subsequent transition to life here in the U.S. That passion led her to a university degree in ethnomusicology.

At first, I was taken in by this band's name.

Then I was knocked out by its "old is new" approach to old-school Chicano funk and soul. And eventually I was won over by the psychedelic veneer with which it glosses everything it touches.

The 59th Annual Grammy nominees were announced Tuesday morning, and while familiar names appeared among the five Latin music categories, there were also some nice surprises.

I have to give credit where credit is due: I found out about the subject of this week's Alt.Latino from a New York Times article relating the story of the discovery of a box of recording-session masters from the now-defunct Caife record label in Quito, Ecuador, dating back to the late 1950s and early '60s.

It's hard to imagine this quietly subtle performer belting out vocals in front of tens of thousands of fans as part of the wildly popular hip-hop group Calle 13. But Ileana Cabra, who performs solo as iLe, lives that kind of life.

We don't talk politics on Alt.Latino, but the core of our mission is to bring people together through music. So this week's episode is something special, with very little talking amidst quiet music that we offer in the hope that it helps you heal after this one-of-a-kind election season.

This week's show was recorded before Tuesday's elections, in the spirit of embracing the future no matter the outcome. So let's all take a deep breath, let it out, and listen.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.


The first thing we must note about this album by the Hart Valley Drifters is that it is not the most authentic bluegrass or old-time music. This is not from a long-lost box of tapes found in a dusty closet, not performed by a group of master folk musicians from somewhere in Appalachia.

2016 has been particularly hard on music fans of all stripes.

Just about everyone of a certain age who grew up in a Latinx household can attest to the power of the tale of La Llorona as a disciplinary tool at bedtime. "You better go to sleep or La Llorona will come into your room and take you away!" is what many of us heard as we hid our heads under the covers.

This week, Alt.Latino takes a literary turn as we explore the world of Latino noir.

Good guys, bad guys and cops who are both; murder, intrigue and gallows humor; highly stylized writing — it's all there, as with any noir fiction. But these books and stories are written by Latinx authors.

I've always thought Nina Diaz was fierce.

Cecilia Villar Eljuri is a triple threat: She's an accomplished songwriter, a great vocalist and one hell of a guitar player. Her work in all three areas is on full display on her new album, La Lucha.

With Eljuri as Alt.Latino's guest DJ this week, we indulge our passion for music that shows off the lead guitar. Her playlist is heavy on classic rock — because, quite frankly, that era is when many of the guitarists who set the bar for lead guitar playing were plying their craft.

We've just enjoyed a short run of Alt.Latino episodes that dig deeper into Cuban music. We've heard a lot of history and met some experts, and I got to play some music from my recent visit to Havana. On this week's show, we'll hear a handful of tracks that reflect some of the musical trends happening in Cuba right now.

The first thing I think of when I consider Cuban music is the piano. I've spent most of my adult life playing Afro-Cuban percussion, so you'd think I would hear things differently.

But actually, the piano is technically a percussion instrument in the grand scheme of European symphonic music. Nowhere is that truer than in Cuba, which has a rich legacy of interpreting Africa through the keyboard.

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