Nation/World

The United States Supreme Court handed down several rulings today — one in particular has a pretty good chance of affecting you. The court said today that employers can indeed force employees into individual arbitration to resolve workplace disputes. Specifically, arbitration agreements that bar employees from participating in class-action lawsuits. Workers’ rights group say the ruling is detrimental.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

For scrap brokers, the trade war is not "on hold"

14 hours ago

Over the weekend, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the prospect of a U.S.-China trade war was “on hold” for now. There’s been a lot of trade headlines lately, but one slice of the Sino-American trading relationship that hasn’t gotten a lot of attention is the multibillion-dollar U.S.-China scrap trade. Earlier this month, the Chinese government suspended the North American branch of the China Certification and Inspection Group North America, which inspects all the shredded steel, corrugated cardboard, beverage containers and other scrap that the U.S.

One patient's death changed the course of Dr. Lilia Cervantes' career. The patient, Cervantes says, was a woman from Mexico with kidney failure who repeatedly visited the emergency room for more than three years. In that time, her heart had stopped more than once, and her ribs were fractured from CPR. The woman finally decided to stop treatment because the stress was too much for her and her two young children. Cervantes says she died soon after.

Congress weighs changes to foreign investment oversight

14 hours ago

In 1975, President Gerald Ford created a committee to oversee foreign investment in the United States. His executive order was prompted, in part, by significant inflows of oil money from places like Saudi Arabia and Iran to buy U.S. companies, said Matthew Baltz, a professor at Bucknell University.

But for its first decade, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, known as CFIUS, didn’t have much bite.

How Theranos, a Silicon Valley star, came tumbling down

15 hours ago

In October 2015, an investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal named John Carreyrou stumbled across a pretty amazing story. The technology behind the much lauded biotech startup, Theranos ... well it didn't work, at least not in the way its founder, Stanford drop out Elizabeth Holmes, had said it did.

Syria's military announced Monday that it cleared Damascus and its suburbs of the last elements of the Islamic state militant group, ISIS.

According to government reports, the Syrian army had driven ISIS out of the rebel group's last remaining strongholds in southern Damascus; this marks the first time that President Bashar al-Assad's government has total control of the capital since the rebellion began in 2011.

Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET

"How good can they be? Spoiler alert: Not Very Good."

That was one hockey writer's analysis of the Vegas Golden Knights back in July, not long after the expansion draft in which the brand-new franchise picked its roster from the dregs of other NHL teams. In other words, roughly 10 months before this Not Very Good ™ team (spoiler alert!) made the Stanley Cup final on Sunday.

A Pakistani exchange student was one of the 10 people shot dead in the Santa Fe High School shooting on Friday. She came from a country where militants have attacked schools and killed students, so her death — in a country that once seemed so much safer than Pakistan — shocked many in her home country.

The commencement speech is a proud tradition. Or at least it's a tradition.

And since no college invited Stacey and Cardiff to give a commencement speech, they're taking to the podcast to offer their own brand of evidence-based wisdom for new college grads.

Links:

Highest Educational Levels Reached by Adults in the U.S. Since 1940

U.S. pauses China tariffs but deal has its shortcomings

16 hours ago

The reason the United States is pausing tariffs on China for now appears to be a promise from China that it will increase its imports from the U.S. — primarily agricultural and energy products. That would presumably help — at least in the short term — to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with China, which was $385 billion in 2016 according to the U.S. Trade Representative. And that would be a good thing, right? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The seas are rising, frequently flooding the streets even when no storms are on the horizon. But that hasn't stopped foreign investors from shelling out big dollars for Miami real estate. Many are in it for the relatively short-term investment, then they'll try to sell before climate change takes its toll, observers of the local market say.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Speechwriter Richard Goodwin, a driving force in American politics during times of upheaval in the 1960s and the husband of presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, has died at age 86.

Goodwin was a key aide and speechwriter for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, crafting messages about civil rights and equality and challenging America to live up to its ideals.

Health workers have unsheathed their experimental new weapon against the Ebola virus in the northwest reaches of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. On Monday, the World Health Organization, together with local and international partners, began administering Ebola vaccinations in the region, where at least 49 suspected cases have been reported since early April and at least 26 people are believed to have died.

The trade war is on hold — for now

17 hours ago

After two days of trade talks in Washington and a high-level trip earlier this month, China and the United States have announced a truce in the simmering trade war, with U.S.-imposed tariffs on hold. We'll spend some time a the top of today's show recapping how we got here, what's settled and what's not. Then: We'll talk to the reporter who wrote the book on the failed blood-testing startup Theranos and the "scorched earth" tactics it took to cover up fraud.

Abby Wambach delivered the keynote address at Barnard College last week. She told the 2018 graduating class — the “wolfpack” — to make failure their fuel.
</a> </div> <p><em>Follow this link to read the full transcription: <a href=" https:="">Abby Wambach, Remarks as Delivered

Health workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo began vaccinating people Monday against an outbreak of Ebola that’s killed at least 26 people. The experimental drug was tested in Guinea two years ago with a 100 percent success rate, but this is the first time a vaccine will be used to control an Ebola outbreak.

There's going to be a changing of the guard in space. On Tuesday, NASA is launching two new satellites, collectively called GRACE, to replace two that have been retired after 16 years in orbit.

War, natural disasters and climate change are destroying some of the world's most precious cultural sites. Google is trying to help preserve these archaeological wonders by allowing users access to 3D images of these treasures through its site.

But the project is raising questions about Google's motivations and about who should own the digital copyrights. Some critics call it a form of "digital colonialism."

Pages