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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Monday was an important date on the way to the 2018 elections. It was the beginning of the period when Illinois candidates have to file petitions with, in some cases, thousands of signatures needed to get on the ballot.

Under federal and state law, anyone convicted of domestic violence loses their right to legally own a gun, but there’s a push to also see that penalty extended to anyone convicted of animal abuse.

Rep. Jeanne Ives continues her campaign to deny Gov. Bruce Rauner renomination as the Republican candidate for governor — a race in which Congressman John Shimkus, the Illinois delegation's senior Republican, is declining to endorse.

Then, do voters care whether candidates release detailed tax returns — or any tax returns — and should they?

Finally, a name from Illinois politics past surfaces as a potential challenger for Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle.

John Shimkus
Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Illinois’ senior Republican Congressman has declined to endorse Governor Bruce Rauner in next year's primary election.

small cell technology
handout / AT&T

AT&T and other mobile phone providers are pushing legislation they say will ease congestion on their networks. But some towns and cities across Illinois are worried it’s really a power grab.

A derivative of photo by Erik Hersman, licensed under CC BY 2.0 / FLICKR

A recent federal appeals court decision struck down the requirement that minor parties offer a full-slate of candidates for statewide or countywide offices, while another court battle looms.

The opioid epidemic continues to sweep across Illinois and the rest of the nation, now declared a public health emergency. But, some believe medical marijuana could be the solution.

GetGredit.com / Flickr-Creative Commons

A recent report shows Illinois is facing a teacher shortage. But changes to teachers’ pensions — including cutbacks on the state’s share of contributions — spells uncertainty for anyone going into the profession.

Gov. Bruce Rauner and Republican challenger Rep. Jeanne Ives hit the road this week. On the Democratic side, J.B. Pritzker sets a deadline for releasing his tax returns, after Sen. Daniel Biss compared him to President Donald Trump.

Meanwhile, Rauner signs ethics legislation that will allow the new legislative inspector general to investigate a backlog of complaints dating back nearly three years.

John Hanlon, Illinois Innocence Project
Illinois Innocence Project

The Illinois Innocence Project, based at the University of Illinois Springfield, has won a $641,000 grant for DNA testing intended to help exonerate wrongfully convicted inmates. 

Jenna Dooley

Bridget Gainer said if women want to change politics, then they’d better start bringing in the money.

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For a true sense of the impact Ken Bradbury has had, his Caring Bridge website lends a clue. It's been visited more than 60,000 times and there are hundreds of comments from those whose lives he’s touched, many of them his former students. 

Watch the eleventh Illinois Issues forum on the state budget and Illinois' financial future in Edwardsville.

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS

Sexual harassment at the Capitol, workers' rights and student loans — a look at recent action in the state legislature.

Flickr.com/morgnar (CC-BY-NC)

Her husband drove drunk on her motorcycle. Should the state get to take it away?

SJ-R

Sean Crawford talks with the State Journal-Register Business Editor Tim Landis.

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

The Illinois General Assembly took some steps last week to address concerns of sexual harassment in the statehouse. But some lawmakers themselves don't think legislators policing each other is the best approach.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is back on Capitol Hill for a House Judiciary Committee hearing about his oversight of the Justice Department. He is also likely to face questions about Trump campaign contacts with Russia. Watch the hearing live and learn about the key players and terms that will likely be raised.

Carter Staley / NPR Illinois

Just when you thought the state’s controversial battle over school funding was over, it turns out there’s a few technicalities that need to be addressed.

The Illinois General Assembly's fall veto session is over, lawmakers have been though sexual harassment awareness training, and Comptroller Susana Mendoza is beginning to pay down the backlog of bills.

Memorial Stadium
Asolsma1988/wikimedia commons

University of Illinois media professor Jay Rosenstein has been a longtime critic of the amount of money spent on athletics on the Urbana campus.

Now he’s published a series of articles that show that millions of taxpayer dollars are spent on U of I athletics each year, despite longtime claims to the contrary.

WATCH: Mexican Democracy In The Age Of Uncertainty - A WACCI Presentation

Nov 9, 2017

Duncan Wood, Director of the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute since January 2013, is a “North American citizen,” lecturing and publishing widely in the United States, Mexico and Canada on intra-continental issues and relations, politics, security and trade with a primary focus on U.S.-Mexican ties.

Jaclyn Driscoll

Women in the Illinois Senate plan to advance their voices in leadership with the creation of their own caucus. Women on both sides of the aisle say they’ve had a significant role in crafting policy, but may not always get the credit they deserve. 

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Rebetika is a popular and controversial style of music in Greece. It's folk music with deep roots. Some have called it the "blues" music of Greece. 

Dusty Rhodes

With teachers devoting much of their time to preparing students for standardized tests, penmanship has disappeared from the curriculum in many schools. A new state law approved yesterday will bring it back, to ensure elementary students get instruction in cursive writing — sometime between 2nd and 5th grade.

State Rep. Emanuel Chris Welch (D-Hillside) filed the measure the same day lawmakers approved his resolution on zombie apocalypse preparedness.

Alex Proimos
Flickr Creative Commons BY-NC 2.0

During the more than two years that Illinois went without a state spending plan, hospitals, dentists and other health care providers waited months or even years to get paid for services to state employees and Medicaid patients.

Dusty Rhodes

Let's say you've got a student loan and you get laid off your job. Your loan servicer suggests something called "forebearance" — the chance to delay payments for a year or two. Sounds tempting, but it ends up costing you more money.

That's one of the many tricky facts loan servicers will have to disclose in Illinois, where lawmakers yesterday approved stringent regulations on student loan service companies.

Haley Scott / @suagrmilkk / haleyscott.com

Mother Nature is Shasta "Klevah" Knox and Tierney Reed aka T.R.U.T.H. We spoke with them about a year ago to learn more about the self-titled debut album and their plans to cause positive change with hip hop.

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

With the final week of veto session underway, the Illinois General Assembly took action meant to address sexual harassment at the state Capitol. 

Rich Saal / The State Journal-Register/pool

Gov. Bruce Rauner is declaring victory after the House failed to override a key veto. The bill was a priority of organized labor.

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