Health+Harvest

NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board identified the subject of food and health as important subjects for coverage in 2012. Health+Harvest provides for community engagement on health and food issues along with reporting on farm, field and fuel.  From seed to plate, from farmer's markets to GMOs, central Illinoisans need to know how to stay healthy and what they are eating.  In 2013, NPR Illinois joined a consortium of public media in the Harvest Public Media network.  The network provides broader coverage to Midwest food issues.

By examining these local, regional and national issues and their implications with in-depth and unbiased reporting, Health+Harvest fills a critical information void.

Support for Health+Harvest coverage comes from Central Illinois Farm Bureaus and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  If you'd like to support this initiative, please contact Nice Bogdanovich at 217-206-9847.

Recent scientific reviews have found substantial evidence that marijuana can be useful in easing at least some types of chronic pain. Yet even for the majority of Americans who live in states that have legalized medical marijuana, choosing opioids can be much cheaper.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

A Baltimore hospital has started an investigation over why a distressed and confused patient was left at a bus stop at night in cold temperatures and wearing just a hospital gown.

A passerby recorded a video Monday showing four security guards walking away from a bus stop next to University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus. One is pushing an empty wheelchair. They appear to have just left the woman at the stop.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The Northeast just emerged from a two-week cold spell. In Vermont, temperatures fell to negative 30 degrees Fahrenheit. And in such extreme cold, rural Vermonters have been quickly burning through a precious wintertime commodity - firewood.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Our next guest has been fielding a lot of questions since the administration gave the go-ahead for Medicaid work requirements. Matt Salo is executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors. Welcome to the program.

It's that time of year when a simple walk down the street can be a treacherous undertaking because of the icy sidewalks.

Emergency rooms in the U.S. treat more people injured in falls than for any other kind of injury, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The agency estimates that falls account for more than a third of all injury-related ER visits. Even though most of those injuries happen to older people, falls happen at any age and can cause serious injury.

The Flu Goes Viral

Jan 11, 2018

Have you been feeling under the weather?

You’re not alone.

From Australia to California to your sofa, the flu has hit the world hard this year, and it might get worse

From the New York Times:

A new Trump administration policy will allow states to screen for “able-bodied” adults who are recipients of Medicaid and impose work requirements on them. It’s a response to what several states have requested, says the White House. From The New York Times:

“In the past, federal officials said that work was not one of the purposes of Medicaid.

A New Show Goes Inside The Teenage Brain

Jan 11, 2018

Journalist Dina Temple-Raston is asking teenagers an age-old question: What were you thinking?

But she’s not asking about a reckless decision that led to a fender-bender with the family car. Instead, she’s talking to teenagers who decided to join ISIS, or who brought guns to school. In her new Audible Original program, “What Were You Thinking? Inside the Adolescent Brain,” Temple-Raston uses psychology, neuroscience and conversation to get inside teenage minds.

At a secluded retreat center outside Austin, about a dozen, mostly middle-aged women are gathered in a quiet conference room. Some huddle under blankets to ward off the chill from an unusual Texas cold spell.

This session's topic: guilt and shame.

"Does anybody feel like they're still dealing with, like, shame? Like, feeling bad about yourself as a person, because of what you've done in the clinics?" Abby Johnson asks the women seated in a circle of chairs around her.

The standing desk is having a moment among office workers, but not everyone needs to stand more at work.

A study published Thursday in the latest issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report finds that many U.S. workers are already active on the job.

The federal government's top fisheries experts say that three widely used pesticides — including the controversial insecticide chlorpyrifos — are jeopardizing the survival of many species of salmon, as well as orcas that feed on those salmon.

It's a fresh attack on a chemical that the Environmental Protection Agency was ready to take off the market a year ago — until the Trump administration changed course.

Elsa D'Silva was 13 years old. She was riding a local train in Mumbai, India, with her mother, sister and brother. And just as she was about to get off, she felt it — a hand reaching up her skirt.

"It affected my ability to use a train as a means of transport — and it still does, even still," D'Silva says. But for 25 years, she didn't tell anyone why she avoided trains.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in 2017 and has been updated.

Tennis superstar Serena Williams clearly has conflicted feelings about marshmallows.

In a just-published interview in Vogue magazine, she and her husband talked about the so-called "marshmallow test." It's a well-known experiment to study children's self-control first run by a Stanford psychologist in the 1960s.

On a bright, beautiful October day, Lebanese fisherman Emilio Eid is in his boat on the Mediterranean Sea. Lebanon's scenic mountain ranges are clear in the distance.

But the water around him is brown and littered with pieces of floating plastic. He spots bottles, a toothbrush, a used condom. An acrid smell burns his eyes and throat.

"Garbage, garbage, garbage," Eid says, and turns to look toward the coast.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is encouraging states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work or volunteer in order to keep their health insurance coverage.

On Thursday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services, issued new guidelines for states that want some adults to work in exchange for the health insurance coverage.

A bumper sticker spotted in Montana reads, "No barley, no beer." It's a reminder that Montana's barley farmers are struggling. Barley is an unforgiving crop that needs a precise recipe of water and sunshine to thrive — too much of either will cause it to wither and die. And amid a changing climate and unpredictable seasons, that's exactly what's happening.

Andrew Gill/WBEZ

  Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner emerged Wednesday from a week-long stay at a state-run military veterans' home beset a series of Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks and announced he wants to replace all the plumbing at the sprawling, 132-year-old site.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Authorities in many coastal states say they want Florida's deal. The Trump administration exempted Florida from offshore oil and gas drilling, and that prompts a question - why Florida and not anywhere else? Here's NPR's Greg Allen.

Some artists in New York may be wishing to get older faster. A gallery there caters to artists age 60 and older. No kids allowed.

Some 200 artists have exhibited at the Carter Burden Gallery since it opened nine years ago in Chelsea. Business is good, and works sell from $200 to $9,000. It's a lot like hundreds of other galleries in New York — except for one important thing: The Carter Burden has an age limit. Why?

Most Americans drink safely and in moderation. But a steady annual increase in trips made to emergency rooms as a result of drinking alcohol added up to 61 percent more visits in 2014 compared with 2006, according to a study published this month in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Visits to hospital emergency rooms for alcohol-related issues rose rapidly over a nine-year period, though it's unclear why.

Chilaquiles is a delicious dish highlighted by a spicy pepper sauce with the texture and corn flavor of crispy homemade tortilla chips. It’s essential to use chips substantial enough to stand up to being stirred into the thick sauce – which means store-bought versions are not ideal. Managing Producer Sally Swift talks with Tucker Shaw, from America’s Test Kitchen, about the best way to get the perfect chip to finish the recipe for Chicken Chilaquiles.

The southern United States is seeing an increase in the number of Mexican and Mexican-American communities. Not only in larger cities, but also in some of the region’s more rural areas. This cultural shift is an area of research that interests many academics including Steven Alvarez, currently an Assistant Professor of English at St. John’s University. In a previous position at the University of Kentucky, he taught classes called "Mexington, Kentucky" and “Taco Literacy." The students learned about some of the newer Latino communities by talking to people and writing about their food.

In its industrial form, a tortilla is basically an edible plate. There's little substance or flavor to it. Jorge Gaviaria says that is not the way it is meant to be. Gaviria is the CEO of Masienda, a company that supports people who grow native varieties of corn in Mexico and uses traditional methods to make tortillas in the US. Francis Lam talked with Gaviria about what makes the difference between a good a tortilla and a great tortilla.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The U.N. is facing a terrible dilemma.

"Basically, when we haven't got enough money, we have to decide who's not going to get food," says Peter Smerdon, a spokesman for the U.N.'s World Food Programme in East Africa.

The results of an IQ test can depend on the gender of the person who's conducting the test. Likewise, studies of pain medication can be completely thrown off by the gender of the experimenter. This underappreciated problem is one reason that some scientific findings don't stand the test of time.

Pages