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Sealing Eviction Filings Could Protect Tenants’ Rights, Advocates Argue

Keeping cases unsealed leaves guiltless tenants at risk for rejection, but that could make it difficult for landlords to be diligent in screening, Realtors say.

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Trending Stories

Illinois Public Radio

Illinois Cities To State: Hands Off Our Taxes

Illinois lawmakers have two weeks to get together a spending plan. Officials from cities across the state are going on the offensive to keep lawmakers from balancing the budget by raiding their pockets.

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Education Desk

MSU Interim President On Nassar Settlement

7 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Statehouse

Rachel Otwell / NPR IllINOIS | 91.9 UIS

Illinois House members will soon consider a measure that clarifies whether graduate research assistants have the right to unionize.  But, Wednesday's Human Services committee hearing took quite a detour. 

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Health+Harvest Desk

JohnTann-WikimediaCommons

Illinois lawmakers could give doctors more protection when it comes to  prescribing experimental drugs for Lyme disease. Experts say the bloodsucking bugs could be expanding their range this year, spreading the disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

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Arts & Life

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois

Last week, Springfield's Iles Elementary School got a surprise when a musician and speaker who travels the world made a stop in town for the day. His message helped inspire acts of kindness and compassion.

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Equity

Public Domain

Earlier this week Governor Bruce Rauner issued an amendatory veto of gun legislation and added his own ideas, including a plan to reinstate the death penalty in certain cases. It would apply to mass shooters and those who kill police officers.

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Illinois Economy

Panel listens to audience question at Forum
UIS Office of Electronic Media / NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS

Watch the first Illinois Issues Forum from Springfield.  Our 2018 election coverage starts discussing the fiscal health of Illinois. 

This forum is produced and hosted by NPR Illinois with support provided by AARP Illinois. 

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Janis Martin, 'The Female Elvis,' Returns

Sep 30, 2012

Janis Martin was just a teenager from Virginia when she was christened "The Female Elvis." In the mid-1950s, she sold 750,000 copies of a song called "Will You, Willyum." She played the Grand Ole Opry, American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. But her fame was short-lived. Martin got married and had a baby, which didn't sit so well with the people managing her career. Her label dropped her, and she fell off the musical map.

Nicolas Kendall
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Violinist Nicolas Kendall, of the East Coast Chamber Orchestra (ECCO) and Time for Three, peforms at the WUIS Suggs Performance Studio previewing his guest role with the Illinois Symphony Orchestra.

Rhett Barnwell
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Harpist Rhett Barnwell joined Karl Scroggin to discuss music therapy and the Chiara Center's harp retreat weekend.

The thought of a baby dying suddenly and unexpectedly is one that keeps parents awake at night, fearing the worst. For years, little was known about sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. Babies would die in their sleep, and it was presumed that little could be done to prevent those deaths.

Several cities have "Hot Clubs" — bands that play so-called "Gypsy jazz" in the tradition of Django Reinhardt. There's the Hot Club of New York, San Francisco and Philadelphia.

Prairieland Voices
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Marion van der Loo directs this preview performance before their holiday performance this weekend.

Jason Vieaux & Lidia Kaminska
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

A live performance by Jason Vieaux & Lidia Kaminska on Classics with Karl Scroggin from November 11, 2010.

As he was approaching 40, Bryan Echols realized he was almost half his father's age, and he became curious about the man who raised him.

"What were you like at 40?" Bryan asked his 80-year-old father, Lindberg Echols, at StoryCorps in Chicago.

"Well, I had seven kids," said Lindberg, who worked at a ceramics factory in Gilberts, Ill., to support his family, which included Bryan and his six siblings, plus two daughters from a different marriage. "And I guess I was pretty tough on the boys," he said.

"It was a relationship that got better," Bryan said.

In some families, a specific talent seems to be passed down through the generations. That could be the case for Ledo Lucietto and his daughter Anne, who share a passion for mechanical engineering.

The Luciettos owned a tool and die shop in Illinois for 50 years. Ledo's father was a mechanical engineer who emigrated from Italy. Their shop was called the Byron-Lambert Co.; they made wire forms and metal stampings.

And as a little girl, Anne was a regular in that shop, asking her grandfather, Luigi, what he was doing as he made parts.

A Son, His Mom And A Story About A Dog

Nov 24, 2008

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Panel listens to audience question at Forum
UIS Office of Electronic Media / NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS

WATCH-LISTEN: Seeking Solutions on State's Fiscal Health

Watch the first Illinois Issues Forum from Springfield. Our 2018 election coverage starts discussing the fiscal health of Illinois. This forum is produced and hosted by NPR Illinois with support provided by AARP Illinois. Jim Edgar, Retired, Illinois Governor / Visiting Senior Fellow, University of Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs (IGPA) Donne Trotter, Retired, Illinois State Senator Beverly Bunch, PhD, Professor, University of Illinois Springfield / State Budget Research...

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Featured

Why having a work spouse is good for you

In their quest for more engaged workers, companies spent years innovating the way we work. They have tried office improvements like standing desks and open-plan offices, free lunch once a week or bagel Fridays. Some companies even bring in puppies. And while those things might work for some people, what really seems to make people care about their job is having a friend at work — specifically, one who is a work spouse. A work spouse is a platonic friend, who the employee made at work and who...

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Illinois Issues

Flickr User: soundfromwayout

Reporter Takes Deep-Dive Into Illini Country In Search Of Chief

Chris Quintana covers the "culture wars" on college campuses and other news for The Chronicle of Higher Education . He was intrigued by the story of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign's one-time icon, Chief Illiniwek. Quintana visited the school and surrounding area for a story released earlier this year .

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Politics

President Trump, speaking on Wednesday to a gathering of officials from California who oppose the state's "sanctuary" law, compared some people who illegally cross the U.S. southern border to "animals."

During a White House roundtable discussion with law enforcement officials and political leaders, Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims expressed frustration that a California law signed last year by Gov. Jerry Brown forbids informing U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement of undocumented immigrants in the state's jails, even if police believe they are part of a gang.

The Koch brothers are going rogue.

For years the political network funded by billionaires Charles and David Koch funded politicians on the right, laying the foundation for the libertarian causes the two support. Their support has gone almost exclusively to Republican candidates, with rare exception.

But in the era of Trump, what it means to be on the "right" is changing, and the Koch network's tactics are changing to reflect new realities.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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PodCamp

The X | 91.9-3 HD

40 Years Later: Was 1978 The Greatest Year In Music?

Imagine you're at a party with your most favorite music geek friends. The conversations range from favorite new albums, and favorite Smiths or Belle and Sebastian B-sides to best Neil Young guitar solos and Drake features. Then comes the big one: What was the greatest year in music? That's a question that we discuss and debate regularly in the World Cafe offices. Almost a year ago , we asked the question, "Was 1967 the greatest year in music?" There's quite a good argument to be made for it,...

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NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

What Does Life In An Orchestra Get You? In The U.K., Not Enough To Live On

Aspiring orchestral musicians have long known that the road to a professional career is arduous and paved with risks. But new research from the U.K. shows that even attaining the brass ring of an orchestral job does not necessarily provide financial security. In fact, even with salaried, full-time employment, many British orchestral musicians are struggling to pay their bills. On Wednesday, the Musicians' Union (MU) in the U.K. published research showing that orchestral players — including...

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