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Beth Martinez and her brother Ben Bloom
Courtesy Beth Martinez

Suicide A Driver Of Gun Deaths In Rural America

The national conversation around gun violence generally centers around mass shootings, school shootings and gang activity. These problems need to be addressed, but may overshadow the largest group affected: suicide victims.

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Illinois Tourism at an All-Time High

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Lawmakers Consider Physician Exemption For Lyme Disease

Illinois lawmakers could give doctors more protection when it comes to prescribing experimental drugs for Lyme disease. Experts say the bloodsucking bugs could be expanding their range this year, spreading the disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

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Education Desk

Michigan State University has agreed in principle to pay $500 million to settle claims by hundreds of women and girls who say disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar abused them.

Under the terms of the agreement, the school will pay $425 million to those 332 current claimants, with $75 million set aside in a trust fund for any future claimants who allege sexual abuse by Nassar.

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Statehouse

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About 114 million people visited Illinois last year, setting a new state record. That’s according to the latest state tourism data released on Tuesday.


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Health+Harvest Desk

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Illinois lawmakers could give doctors more protection when it comes to  prescribing experimental drugs for Lyme disease. Experts say the bloodsucking bugs could be expanding their range this year, spreading the disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

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Arts & Life

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois

Last week, Springfield's Iles Elementary School got a surprise when a musician and speaker who travels the world made a stop in town for the day. His message helped inspire acts of kindness and compassion.

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Equity

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

A measure to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment got approval from an Illinois House committee Wednesday, in what could be the final step before it's called for a decisive vote in that chamber.  

The measure has already passed the state Senate. Opponents argue it could mandate government funded abortions and force co-ed prison populations.

Chief sponsor and Democratic representative from Skokie, Lou Lang, says two of his colleagues told him they're worried a "yes" vote could be used against them in future campaigns.

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Illinois Economy

Panel listens to audience question at Forum
UIS Office of Electronic Media / NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS

Watch the first Illinois Issues Forum from Springfield.  Our 2018 election coverage starts discussing the fiscal health of Illinois. 

This forum is produced and hosted by NPR Illinois with support provided by AARP Illinois. 

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As he was approaching 40, Bryan Echols realized he was almost half his father's age, and he became curious about the man who raised him.

"What were you like at 40?" Bryan asked his 80-year-old father, Lindberg Echols, at StoryCorps in Chicago.

"Well, I had seven kids," said Lindberg, who worked at a ceramics factory in Gilberts, Ill., to support his family, which included Bryan and his six siblings, plus two daughters from a different marriage. "And I guess I was pretty tough on the boys," he said.

"It was a relationship that got better," Bryan said.

In some families, a specific talent seems to be passed down through the generations. That could be the case for Ledo Lucietto and his daughter Anne, who share a passion for mechanical engineering.

The Luciettos owned a tool and die shop in Illinois for 50 years. Ledo's father was a mechanical engineer who emigrated from Italy. Their shop was called the Byron-Lambert Co.; they made wire forms and metal stampings.

And as a little girl, Anne was a regular in that shop, asking her grandfather, Luigi, what he was doing as he made parts.

A Son, His Mom And A Story About A Dog

Nov 24, 2008

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Mothers and Daughters, and a Blessing

Jul 3, 2008

Sue Hyde lives in Cambridge, Mass., with her wife, Jade McGleughlin, their daughter, Jesse, 14 and their son, Max, 12.

The makeup of their household is not as rare as it once was — and certainly not as rare as it was when Hyde was growing up, in a small town in rural Illinois.

Asked by her daughter about the differences between their childhoods, Hyde's response is, "I grew up in one of those very typical families, with a mom and a dad. And there were seven kids."

StoryCorps Griot: Field of Dreams

Oct 16, 2007

This week's installment of StoryCorps Griot features William and Glen Haley.

They remember their father, Joseph Howard Haley, who founded the Jackie Robinson West Little League in 1971 on the South Side of Chicago.

Although the league only had one team at its inception, it fostered the talents of ballplayers who later played in the major leagues. Such players include Emil Brown, Marvell Wyne and Hall of Famer Kirby Puckett.

In the 2007 season, the 12- year-old team was ranked third in the state of Illinois.

This I Believe: A Koala Bear

Jan 29, 2007
NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

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A Return to the Roots of Childhood

Dec 15, 2005

At 68, Barb Fuller-Curry lives across the road from the farm where she grew up, in Whiteside County, Ill. In her youth, Fuller-Curry's father and mother took turns working the fields in order to make ends meet.

After raising her own family elsewhere, Fuller-Curry returned to the farm after 40 years to care for her mother, who passed away earlier this year. The house Curry lives in is one her parents built.

Speaking with her 34-year-old son, Craig, Fuller-Curry recalled the sacrifices her parents made -- and how little she thought about it at the time, when she was just 7.

Kidnapped Tourists Killed in Yemen

Oct 27, 2002

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The complete act that started public media. Subpart D — Corporation for Public Broadcasting Sec. 396. [47 U.S.C. 396] Corporation for Public Broadcasting (a) Congressional declaration of policy The Congress hereby finds and declares that —

Eight years before WUIS began began broadcasting, the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 initiated consideration in communities and colleges what might be done with public media. "It announces to the world that our Nation wants more than just material wealth; our Nation wants more than a "chicken in every pot." We in America have an appetite for excellence, too. While we work every day to produce new goods and to create new wealth, we want most of all to enrich man's spirit. That is the purpose of this act." President Lyndon Johnson's remarks up signing the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967

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Methodist College students take a break between classes at the campus in Peoria, which is a former furniture store.
Mary Hansen / NPR IllINOIS | 91.9 UIS

Outside The Big Box: Repurposing Vacant Space In Illinois

As more retail chains shut down, cities across Illinois figure out what to do with millions of square feet of empty space.

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Illinois Issues

Jaclyn Driscoll

Reporter Finds Carrying A Gun Carries Weighty Responsibility

In the wake of mass shootings comes the debate around gun laws. This week, I explore a different angle: the personal responsibility of carrying a firearm.

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Politics

'The Great Revolt' In The Voting Booth

2 hours ago

Donald Trump’s victory in 2016 may have surprised a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean it was a fluke.

Journalists, pundits, professors and political strategists have spent over a year analyzing how Trump won. In their new book The Great Revolt, columnist Salena Zito and Republican strategist Brad Todd look at who Trump won. Who are the voters who put them over the top?

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

In his annual disclosure of personal finances, President Trump acknowledged that he paid lawyer Michael Cohen between $100,000 and $250,000 last year.

Cohen and Trump defense attorney Rudolph Giuliani have both said some of that money was to reimburse Cohen for a $130,000 hush money settlement with adult film actress Stormy Daniels, who says she had an affair with Trump.

If Scott Pruitt arrived on Capitol Hill expecting to be grilled Wednesday, he did not have to wait long to see that expectation fulfilled.

The Senate intelligence committee voted 10-5 Wednesday to recommend Gina Haspel as CIA director despite the controversy surrounding her role in the agency's waterboarding program.

The full Senate now appears all but certain to confirm Haspel within the next week or so, which would make her the first woman to lead the CIA.

Her confirmation also would complete President Trump's recent shakeup of his national security and foreign policy teams.

In last week's primaries, Republican internal divisions were highlighted. But Tuesday night, it was the Democrats' turn — and in some of the very places the party needs to win to take back the House.

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PodCamp

The X | 91.9-3 HD

40 Years Later: Was 1978 The Greatest Year In Music?

Imagine you're at a party with your most favorite music geek friends. The conversations range from favorite new albums, and favorite Smiths or Belle and Sebastian B-sides to best Neil Young guitar solos and Drake features. Then comes the big one: What was the greatest year in music? That's a question that we discuss and debate regularly in the World Cafe offices. Almost a year ago , we asked the question, "Was 1967 the greatest year in music?" There's quite a good argument to be made for it,...

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NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

What Does Life In An Orchestra Get You? In The U.K., Not Enough To Live On

Aspiring orchestral musicians have long known that the road to a professional career is arduous and paved with risks. But new research from the U.K. shows that even attaining the brass ring of an orchestral job does not necessarily provide financial security. In fact, even with salaried, full-time employment, many British orchestral musicians are struggling to pay their bills. On Wednesday, the Musicians' Union (MU) in the U.K. published research showing that orchestral players — including...

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