Trending Stories

Mary Cullen / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

A Call For Immunization

With more cases of vaccine-preventable disease in Illinois, doctors say shots should not be skipped.

Read More
Smith talking with young student
Illinois State Board of Education / Facebook

More Dollars Add Up To Less Trust


Bruce Rauner
Rich Saal / The State Journal-Register (pool)

2018 Budget Address

Read More Statehouse Stories

Education Desk

For much of the past half-century, children, adolescents and young adults in the U.S. have been saying they feel as though their lives are increasingly out of their control. At the same time, rates of anxiety and depression have risen steadily.

What's the fix? Feeling in control of your own destiny. Let's call it "agency."

"Agency may be the one most important factor in human happiness and well-being."

Read More Education Stories

Health+Harvest Desk

Nearly 40 years of violent conflict is driving a growing mental health crisis in Afghanistan.

Read More Health+Harvest Stories

Arts & Life

It is a truth universally acknowledged that no one is more of an expert in love than romance authors. Whether it's a dream date, the most seductive way to show affection or the most dramatic way to declare your feelings, romance novelists know how to set the scene for a truly authentic and emotional moment to make us all swoon. So in honor of Valentine's Day, I asked some of my fellow authors to share the scenes that defined romance for them. The best part: There's nothing here you can't try at home.

Maya Rodale is a best-selling romance author.

Read More Arts & Life Stories


Terry Farmer

For decades, women have been battling to break through the “glass ceilings” in their chosen fields. To the Front is an NPR Illinois series where we talk with female and nonbinary people about the way their identity intersects with their art and work. 

Read More Equity Stories

Illinois Economy

Check cashing signage
Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr/

A group of Illinois state legislators want to lower check cashing rates at currency exchanges — while the industry is pushing to raise those rates.


Last summer, the industry told Illinois’ financial regulator it hadn’t been allowed to increase service fees since 2007, and the time had come for a raise. 

Read More Illinois Economy Coverage

A Return to the Roots of Childhood

Dec 15, 2005

At 68, Barb Fuller-Curry lives across the road from the farm where she grew up, in Whiteside County, Ill. In her youth, Fuller-Curry's father and mother took turns working the fields in order to make ends meet.

After raising her own family elsewhere, Fuller-Curry returned to the farm after 40 years to care for her mother, who passed away earlier this year. The house Curry lives in is one her parents built.

Speaking with her 34-year-old son, Craig, Fuller-Curry recalled the sacrifices her parents made -- and how little she thought about it at the time, when she was just 7.

The complete act that started public media. Subpart D — Corporation for Public Broadcasting Sec. 396. [47 U.S.C. 396] Corporation for Public Broadcasting (a) Congressional declaration of policy The Congress hereby finds and declares that —

Eight years before WUIS began began broadcasting, the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 initiated consideration in communities and colleges what might be done with public media. "It announces to the world that our Nation wants more than just material wealth; our Nation wants more than a "chicken in every pot." We in America have an appetite for excellence, too. While we work every day to produce new goods and to create new wealth, we want most of all to enrich man's spirit. That is the purpose of this act." President Lyndon Johnson's remarks up signing the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967


Social Action - Thanks for Sharing!

Gov. Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Even Without A Budget, Illinois Spends And Spends

Gov. Bruce Rauner is scheduled to unveil his fourth budget proposal Wednesday in a speech to the General Assembly. Illinois lawmakers have only enacted a budget for one of the three years he’s been in office. That led to service cuts and some layoffs, but the state didn’t collapse. For most people, life went on as normal. So we asked Statehouse reporter Brian Mackey: Does it really matter if Illinois has a budget?

Read More

Illinois Issues

Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Peace Rooms and Mindfulness: New School Discipline Philosophy One Year Later

School districts had a year to implement a state law that banned zero-tolerance policies and emphasized restorative justice practices. We check back in with five districts we visited in the summer of 2016 to see how school discipline has changed.

Read More
Mary Cullen / NPR ILLINOIS | 91.9 UIS

The Radium Girls: An Illinois Tragedy

Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The Radium Girls: Cleaning Up Contamination


The Key To Raising A Happy Child

For much of the past half-century, children, adolescents and young adults in the U.S. have been saying they feel as though their lives are increasingly out of their control. At the same time, rates of anxiety and depression have risen steadily. What's the fix? Feeling in control of your own destiny. Let's call it "agency." "Agency may be the one most important factor in human happiness and well-being." So write William Stixrud and Ned Johnson in their new book, The Self-Driven Child: The...

Read More

Low-Wage Workers Say #MeToo Movement Is A Chance For Change

The campaign to speak out against workplace sexual harassment began with women in Hollywood and in the media — those in positions of relative power and privilege. Now, women in retail, agriculture and domestic work — where harassment rates run very high — say they, too, are starting to feel the impact of the #MeToo movement. "It's had an incredibly dramatic impact in our industry," says Saru Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a group that advocates for better...

Read More

Continued Interest

Confessions Of A Former White Supremacist

A former white supremacist is coming to Springfield to talk about his shift from racial hate to "rational love." Joseph Pearce is Tolkien & Lewis Chair in Literary Studies at Holy Apostles College & Seminary and Senior Editor at the Augustine Institute.

Read More


To celebrate Valentine's Day, you can buy a sappy card. Or a silly one.

Or, you can buy one that takes on Islamophobia with messages like "This burka is built for two" and "First Muslim Registry ... Then Wedding Registry."

These are some of the valentine creations of Tanzila Ahmed, a Los-Angeles-based writer, artist, activist and co-host of the podcast #GoodMuslimBadMuslim.

The messages make people laugh — and squirm. And that was absolutely her intention, Ahmed says.

Democrats say the results of a special election in Florida Tuesday show signs of a building national momentum heading into the midterm elections this fall. Margaret Good won in Florida's 72nd House District, defeating Republican James Buchanan — the son of another Florida congressman, Vern Buchanan. The district, in Sarasota County on Florida's Gulf Coast, has been consistently Republican.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

The White House's story about who knew what when about accusations of domestic violence against former White House staff secretary Rob Porter has been anything but clear.

Now, House Republicans have decided to open an investigation to get some clarity.

Senators Begin Open Debate On Immigration

8 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


The X | 91.9-3 HD

Announcing The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest It's time to crank up the amps, warm up the drum machines, dust off the sax (or whatever your instrument of choice is) and enter the Tiny Desk Contest . When we started the contest in 2014, we did it for one simple reason: We love discovering new music. And since then, this contest has been an amazing way to do just that. I've been thrilled to discover new artists from around the country and hear some unforgettable music through your videos. I've...

Read More

NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

Classical Music's Greatest Love Stories, On And Offstage Classical music has plenty of infamous fictional couples: Dido and Aeneas, Mimì and Rodolfo, and of course, Romeo and Juliet. "The thing about fictional love stories in music is that, especially in opera, most of them end very badly, you know, with the lovers singing heartrending arias just before they die," says Miles Hoffman, The American Chamber Players...

Read More