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Gov. Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Even Without A Budget, Illinois Spends And Spends

Gov. Bruce Rauner is scheduled to unveil his fourth budget proposal Wednesday in a speech to the General Assembly. Illinois lawmakers have only enacted a budget for one of the three years he’s been in office. That led to service cuts and some layoffs, but the state didn’t collapse. For most people, life went on as normal. So we asked Statehouse reporter Brian Mackey: Does it really matter if Illinois has a budget?

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Trending Stories

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

'Equal Parenting Time' Proposal Stirring Debate In Illinois

Illinois is joining 35 other states this year attempting to give divorced couples equal parenting time. The issue is stirring debate among family law attorneys, mental health professionals, parents and others.

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN MACKEY AND KEITH COOPER / CC BY 2.0 / A DERIVATIVE OF MONEY / PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CARTER STALEY / NPR ILLINOIS

'Moneyball' : The 2018 Illinois Governor's Race

Statehouse

Gov. Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Gov. Bruce Rauner is scheduled to unveil his fourth budget proposal Wednesday in a speech to the General Assembly.

Illinois lawmakers have only enacted a budget for one of the three years he’s been in office.

That led to service cuts and some layoffs, but the state didn’t collapse. For most people, life went on as normal.

So we asked Statehouse reporter Brian Mackey: Does it really matter if Illinois has a budget?

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Education Desk

A free day at the aquarium! For Marcey Morse, a mother of two, it sounded pretty good.

It was the fall of 2016, and Morse had received an email offering tickets, along with a warning about her children's education.

At that time, Morse's two kids were enrolled in an online, or "virtual," school called the Georgia Cyber Academy, run by a company called K12 Inc. About 275,000 students around the country attend these online public charter schools, run by for-profit companies, at taxpayers' expense.

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Health+Harvest Desk

This year, Bill and Melinda Gates are doing something a little different with their annual letter. They are answering what they call some of the "toughest questions" from their foundation's critics.

On the list: Is it fair that you have the influence you do? Why don't you give more to the United States? Why do you give your money away?

Since its inception, the Gates Foundation has given $41.3 billion in grants, including a grant to NPR.

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Arts & Life

On Sunday, April 15, 1990, TV history was made with the debut of the sketch comedy show “In Living Color.”

It was raw. It was offensive. It was hilarious.

But most of all, it was unapologetically black.

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Equity

Check cashing signage
Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A group of Illinois state legislators want to lower check cashing rates at currency exchanges — while the industry is pushing to raise those rates.

 

Last summer, the industry told Illinois’ financial regulator it hadn’t been allowed to increase service fees since 2007, and the time had come for a raise. 

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Illinois Economy

Todd Maisch
Illinois Chamber of Commerce

After one year of Donald Trump’s presidency, the business community is largely pleased with the results: reductions in tax rates and a rollback of Obama-era environmental regulations. But there are concerns about the president's positions on immigration, and the general chaos of the White House.

For more on the business perspective of Trump's first year in office, I spoke with with Todd Maisch, president of the Illinois Chamber of Commerce. I began by asking him what, from a business perspective, were the best things to come out of Washington this year.

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Jason Vieaux & Lidia Kaminska
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

A live performance by Jason Vieaux & Lidia Kaminska on Classics with Karl Scroggin from November 11, 2010.

As he was approaching 40, Bryan Echols realized he was almost half his father's age, and he became curious about the man who raised him.

"What were you like at 40?" Bryan asked his 80-year-old father, Lindberg Echols, at StoryCorps in Chicago.

"Well, I had seven kids," said Lindberg, who worked at a ceramics factory in Gilberts, Ill., to support his family, which included Bryan and his six siblings, plus two daughters from a different marriage. "And I guess I was pretty tough on the boys," he said.

"It was a relationship that got better," Bryan said.

In some families, a specific talent seems to be passed down through the generations. That could be the case for Ledo Lucietto and his daughter Anne, who share a passion for mechanical engineering.

The Luciettos owned a tool and die shop in Illinois for 50 years. Ledo's father was a mechanical engineer who emigrated from Italy. Their shop was called the Byron-Lambert Co.; they made wire forms and metal stampings.

And as a little girl, Anne was a regular in that shop, asking her grandfather, Luigi, what he was doing as he made parts.

A Son, His Mom And A Story About A Dog

Nov 24, 2008

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mothers and Daughters, and a Blessing

Jul 3, 2008

Sue Hyde lives in Cambridge, Mass., with her wife, Jade McGleughlin, their daughter, Jesse, 14 and their son, Max, 12.

The makeup of their household is not as rare as it once was — and certainly not as rare as it was when Hyde was growing up, in a small town in rural Illinois.

Asked by her daughter about the differences between their childhoods, Hyde's response is, "I grew up in one of those very typical families, with a mom and a dad. And there were seven kids."

StoryCorps Griot: Field of Dreams

Oct 16, 2007

This week's installment of StoryCorps Griot features William and Glen Haley.

They remember their father, Joseph Howard Haley, who founded the Jackie Robinson West Little League in 1971 on the South Side of Chicago.

Although the league only had one team at its inception, it fostered the talents of ballplayers who later played in the major leagues. Such players include Emil Brown, Marvell Wyne and Hall of Famer Kirby Puckett.

In the 2007 season, the 12- year-old team was ranked third in the state of Illinois.

This I Believe: A Koala Bear

Jan 29, 2007
NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Lauren Ross - Rochester HS

A Return to the Roots of Childhood

Dec 15, 2005

At 68, Barb Fuller-Curry lives across the road from the farm where she grew up, in Whiteside County, Ill. In her youth, Fuller-Curry's father and mother took turns working the fields in order to make ends meet.

After raising her own family elsewhere, Fuller-Curry returned to the farm after 40 years to care for her mother, who passed away earlier this year. The house Curry lives in is one her parents built.

Speaking with her 34-year-old son, Craig, Fuller-Curry recalled the sacrifices her parents made -- and how little she thought about it at the time, when she was just 7.

The complete act that started public media. Subpart D — Corporation for Public Broadcasting Sec. 396. [47 U.S.C. 396] Corporation for Public Broadcasting (a) Congressional declaration of policy The Congress hereby finds and declares that —

Eight years before WUIS began began broadcasting, the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 initiated consideration in communities and colleges what might be done with public media. "It announces to the world that our Nation wants more than just material wealth; our Nation wants more than a "chicken in every pot." We in America have an appetite for excellence, too. While we work every day to produce new goods and to create new wealth, we want most of all to enrich man's spirit. That is the purpose of this act." President Lyndon Johnson's remarks up signing the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967

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Photo provided by: Kathryn Harris

Harris Ends Historic Presidency For Lincoln Association

After a historic term as president of the Abraham Lincoln Association, Kathryn Harris is passing the gavel this week at the annual banquet and symposium celebrating Abraham Lincoln's 209th birthday anniversary.

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Illinois Issues

Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Peace Rooms and Mindfulness: New School Discipline Philosophy One Year Later

School districts had a year to implement a state law that banned zero-tolerance policies and emphasized restorative justice practices. We check back in with five districts we visited in the summer of 2016 to see how school discipline has changed.

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Mary Cullen / NPR ILLINOIS | 91.9 UIS

The Radium Girls: An Illinois Tragedy

Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The Radium Girls: Cleaning Up Contamination

Featured

When Did Marriage Become So Hard?

No one will deny that marriage is hard. In fact, there's evidence it's getting even harder.

Eli Finkel, a social psychologist at Northwestern University, argues that's because our expectations of marriage have increased dramatically in recent decades.

"[A] marriage that would have been acceptable to us in the 1950s is a disappointment to us today because of those high expectations," he says. The flip side of that disappointment, of course, is a marriage that's pretty...

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Low-Wage Workers Say #MeToo Movement Is A Chance For Change

The campaign to speak out against workplace sexual harassment began with women in Hollywood and in the media — those in positions of relative power and privilege. Now, women in retail, agriculture and domestic work — where harassment rates run very high — say they, too, are starting to feel the impact of the #MeToo movement. "It's had an incredibly dramatic impact in our industry," says Saru Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a group that advocates for better...

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Continued Interest

amazon.com

Confessions Of A Former White Supremacist

A former white supremacist is coming to Springfield to talk about his shift from racial hate to "rational love." Joseph Pearce is Tolkien & Lewis Chair in Literary Studies at Holy Apostles College & Seminary and Senior Editor at the Augustine Institute.

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Politics

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The X | 91.9-3 HD

Announcing The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2Pf41N5Rqo It's time to crank up the amps, warm up the drum machines, dust off the sax (or whatever your instrument of choice is) and enter the Tiny Desk Contest . When we started the contest in 2014, we did it for one simple reason: We love discovering new music. And since then, this contest has been an amazing way to do just that. I've been thrilled to discover new artists from around the country and hear some unforgettable music through your videos. I've...

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NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

Classical Music's Greatest Love Stories, On And Offstage

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NAu1mS2QsQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNa378n3QwI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZwDv3md3uY Classical music has plenty of infamous fictional couples: Dido and Aeneas, Mimì and Rodolfo, and of course, Romeo and Juliet. "The thing about fictional love stories in music is that, especially in opera, most of them end very badly, you know, with the lovers singing heartrending arias just before they die," says Miles Hoffman, The American Chamber Players...

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